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Girl Power: G.R.L. Talks New Music, Tour Plans

It’s been more than three years since the ladies of G.R.L were first brought together by former Pussycat Doll, Robin Antin.

Originally created to be a reboot of the group Antin made famous, the women of G.R.L. (Simone Battle, Lauren Bennett, Emmalyn Estrada, Natasha Slayton and Paula Van Oppen) instead took on a life of their own – appearing in the video for Pitbull’s song “Wild Wild Love” as well as releasing several infectiously good singles of their own, including the track “Vacation” which featured former Spice Girl Mel B.

G.R.L.

G.R.L.

On July 29th, the long awaited G.R.L self-titled debut will officially be unveiled, giving the ladies their first taste of album exposure. Coinciding with the release of the EP, G.R.L will soon embark on a trip down-under to promote their new music.

The thing that sets G.R.L. apart from many of their counterparts (both male and female) is their ability to create infectious songs that become even more addicting on subsequent listens. Songs like “Show Me What You Got” and their recent single and video for the song “Ugly Heart” infuse hooky R&B and pop-rock grooves with positive, girl power messages.

I had the pleasure of speaking with the ladies of G.R.L about their new album, touring and their thoughts on becoming the model for the next generation of Girl Power!

How excited are you that the EP is going to be released?

Natasha: I’m kind of nervous, actually [laughs]. We’ve worked really hard on it. It’s our baby and we’re finally putting it out there for the world to see. We’re very excited to see what the response will be.

Lauren: There’s also a song on the EP that no one has heard yet, which is a bit different then what we’ve put out thus far. We’re excited to see how fans will feel about that new song.

How would you describe the new album?

Simone: It’s very charged, with a lot of girl empowering anthems. We have some R&B and some 90′s throwback jams as well as an electro, pop-rock song. Then there’s “Ugly Heart” which is unique in its own way. It’s a mix of a bunch of different vibes.

Emma: We love positive messages and songs that make us want to dance immediately. If something can make us move, then we know we’re really feeling it from the inside and we become passionate about it.

What can you tell me about the song “Ugly Heart”?

Natasha: “Ugly Heart” is a song about inner-beauty and about how you should never judge a book by its cover. Just because someone has a pretty face, doesn’t mean their inside will match. And if you don’t have inner-beauty, then we’re going to leave you far behind!

What are your touring plans?

Paula: We’ll be going to Australia at the beginning of August. We’re excited about that because “Ugly Heart” is doing really well over there. While we’re there, we’ll be doing a performance on X-Factor Australia and will be traveling to places like Sydney and Melbourne to promote the record.

You’re all involved with so many different aspects of a project. Everything from recording to choreography. Is there a part of the process that you enjoy more than others?

Lauren: I love getting cool outfits and dressing up. As a little girl, it was always fun to put on a fancy dress. Now, being an adult and being able to dress up and be on stage or in a music video is one of the coolest things for me.

Natasha: I love performing and meeting the fans. The performance and seeing everything come together. Just being able to express myself on stage and getting the fans to sing and dance along with us is awesome.

Simone: I love the creative process of it. Being in the studio until two or three in the morning until a song is finished. I love all of the aspects of it, but being in the studio is one of my favorite things.

What was it like working with Pitbull for the video “Wild Wild Love”?

Lauren: I was nervous, because we didn’t really know how things were going to go until we got on set. We had never met Pitbull prior to the show and after he walked in the room the director handed me this sheet of paper and said, “Ok, here you go. You’ve got to read these lines with Pitbull.” I remember being incredibly nervous, but he was so nice and professional. It went really smoothly.

Paula: He’s also a lot of fun to work with. I remember after we shot the video, we all went out on a boat and he showed us around. He definitely knows how to have a good time.

Mel B appeared in your video for “Vacation”. What was it like working with her and sort-of picking up the torch to be the next generation of Girl Power?

Natasha: We grew up idolizing The Spice Girls. I remember wanting to be Sporty Spice and having all of my friends dress up with me. Having Mel B being in our video and giving us advice was the coolest thing and a dream come true.

Lauren: Mel B represents one of the biggest girl groups in the world of all time. For her to be a part of our journey is one of the best things we could ever have.

What are you most looking forward to about the new album and what’s next for G.R.L.?

Lauren: We’re not really sure about where things are going to go. All we know is that we’ve waited so long for this moment and things are happening really quickly now. Australia is really picking up on the new record. I’m really excited that the ball is rolling!

G.R.L (Track Listing):

1. Ugly Heart
2. Show Me What You Got
3. Rewind
4. Don’t Talk About Love
5. Girls Are Always Right

Ted Nugent Brings Rock Revival, Spiritual Jam To Penns Peak

Guitarist, hunter and American advocate Ted Nugent is certainly no stranger to the backwoods of northeastern Pennsylvania. In fact, a recent stop at Penns Peak in Jim Thorpe a few years ago became the setting for Nugent’s 2011 live CD/DVD Ultralive Ballisticrock. Yeah, folks around these parts know that when Uncle Ted’s in town (like he was last night at Penns Peak) – attendance is mandatory!

Ted Nugent Bring The Heat to Penns Peak

Ted Nugent Brings The Heat to Penns Peak

Nugent’s live show is one part sermon, one part history lesson and one part spiritual revival. It’s a line drawn in the sand where (like most things) Nugent is either admired and solidified for the attitude, or despised for it. But Nugent says let the chips fall where they may. He believes in focusing on quality of life in all of those arenas, because quality of life comes from all of those issues.

Together with his killer band made up of Derek St. Holmes (guitar/vocals); Greg Smith (bass) and Mick Brown (drums), Nugent infused the senses with an arsenal of material at The Peak. Channeling the same blues masters that inspired his own guitar prowess, while continuing to wave the flag for a love of God and country.

In addition to giving the audience a master class in virtuoso musicianship, Nugent thanked the crowd for making his “Spirit of the Wild” the #1 hunting show in the world; took credit for being the most hated man in America by a President; instructed the crowd that the biggest duty of any American is to raise hell and even called upon the spirit of his longtime mentor and blood brother Fred Bear before launching into what Nugent calls the “greatest guitar riff of all time”- “Cat Scratch Fever”. Nugent even gave his fellow hunters and NRA members a dose of “Shut Up & Jam!” – the title track from his new studio album released earlier this month.

Ted Nugent and Greg Smith bring their message to the masses

Ted Nugent and Greg Smith bring their message to the masses

Ted Nugent is on the verge of playing his 6,500th live show. To put that into perspective, that would be like playing a concert a night (every night) for almost 18 years. But Nugent himself will tell you that every single one of those shows is the most important show on Earth. It’s why he continues to surround himself with others who are also masters of their craft, and why fans like me are so grateful.

Driving down the long hill that leads from Penns Peak back to the Pennsylvania Turnpike and to my home, I realized that even though the world may be in rough shape, our future is in good hands.

Ted Nugent Set List: (Penns Peak)

Gonzo
Just What The Doctor Ordered
Free For All
Turn It Up
Wang Dang Sweet Poontang
I Can’t Quit You Baby (Otis Rush cover)
Live It Up
Queen Of The Forest
Need You Bad
Shut Up & Jam
Hey Baby
Fred Bear
Cat Scratch Fever
Stranglehold
Great White Buffalo

‘Rockabilly Riot’: Brian Setzer Talks New Album, Gretsch Guitars and Future of Rockabilly

Rockabilly Riot - Brian SetzerFollowing last year’s successful Christmas tour with his 18-piece orchestra, iconic guitarist, songwriter and three-time Grammy winner Brian Setzer entered the studio to get back to his rockabilly roots — with incredible results.

Setzer’s new album, Rockabilly Riot: All Original, which will be released August 12 via Surfdog Records, is pure, straight-ahead rockabilly that features 12 new, original songs. Along with his trademark twang and fretboard fire, Setzer is backed by three musicians who are among the best at their craft — Mark Winchester (bass), Kevin McKendree (piano) and Noah Levy (drums).

The album, which was recorded in Nashville, was produced by Peter Collins, who handled those same duties for Setzer’s Vavoom! and The Dirty Boogie. The result is a cross-mix of early Stray Cats and Setzer’s solo records, with an emphasis on a fresh, modern rockabilly sound.

Setzer first captured the hearts of guitarists everywhere as founder and frontman of Stray Cats, whose signature songs “Rock This Town,” “(She’s) Sexy & 17” and “Stray Cat Strut” introduced the sound and attitude of rockabilly to a new generation of rock fans in the early Eighties.

I recently spoke to Setzer about Rockabilly Riot: All Original, his early days, guitars and what the future holds for rockabilly music.

GUITAR WORLD: How would you describe the sound of Rockabilly Riot?

To me, it sounds a little bit like a mixture of an album I had called Ignition and the first Stray Cats album. The production of it is straight forward, but it really is songs first. Then I make them into rockabilly just by me playing them.

You can read the rest of my
gw_logoWith Brian Setzer by Clicking Here!

‘1000hp’: Guitarist Tony Rombola Talks New Godsmack Album and Side Project

Godsmack (Photo: Michael Chapman)

Godsmack (Photo: Michael Chapman)

Multi-platinum hard rock heroes Godsmack are revving their engines for their highly anticipated sixth studio album, 1000hp The album, which is set for an August 5 release, is the follow-up to 2010’s The Oracle, which debuted at Number 1 on Billboard’s Top 200.

Co-produced by Sully Erna along with Dave Fortman (Slipknot, Evanescence), 1000hp returns the band to their Boston-based roots. Even the album’s title track pays homage to the band’s journey from playing tiny clubs to packed arenas worldwide.

With a new-found thrashed-up “punk” energy, 1000hp is really about going back to basics. It’s old-school Godsmack, but with a new kind of twist.

Coinciding with the release of 1000hp,  Godsmack will also headline this year’s Rockstar Energy Drink UPROAR Festival, which kicks off August 14. Godsmack is Sully Erna (vocals), Tony Rombola (guitar), Robbie Merrill (bass) and Shannon Larkin (drums).

I recently spoke with Rombola about 1000hp, touring and his blues-based side project, the Blue Cross Band.

GUITAR WORLD: How would you describe the sound of 1000hp?

We wanted it to be straight forward and simple. I think that was the theme. There are elements of punk in some of the grooves that Sully brought in, and even in the selection of some of the riffs that I had as well. A lot of it is simpler, with some different feels.

What’s the songwriting process for a Godsmack album?

For me, it all starts with riffs Shannon and I put together and arrange into a demo. We’ll bring in a bunch of the material and Sully will go through it to get vibe for the record. He has great vision. He also brought in riffs for the songs “Something Different” and “Life Is Good”. Sully’s the one who picks the direction for the album and works on the lyrics. I’m more focused on the music. For me, it’s all about the guitar.

Read the rest of my
gw_logoWith Tony Rombola by Clicking Here!

 

Tom Bailey Talks Retro Futura, Thompson Twins and The 80’s

Tom Bailey

Tom Bailey

Fans of 80’s new wave music may find it hard to believe that it’s been twenty-seven years since the Thompson Twins performed their final show in August of 1987.

In the years since, lead singer, keyboardist, guitarist and songwriter Tom Bailey has kept himself busy with several other successful musical projects, with no real inclination of ever revisiting his former band’s catalog again.

But all of that is about to change.

This August, Bailey (along with synth pioneer Howard Jones) will co-headline the Retro Futura Tour. A jam-packed show that will also feature sets from Ultravox’s Midge Ure, China Crisis and Katrina (ex-Katrina And The Waves). In addition to it being an amazing evening of live music, fans will also witness an historic event, as this tour marks the first time Bailey will be performing Thompson Twins hits live in nearly three decades.

The Thompson Twins (whose classic line-up consisted of Bailey, Alannah Currie and Joe Leeway) had huge hits on both sides of the Atlantic in the mid-eighties; with songs like “Hold Me Now”, “Doctor Doctor” and “Lay Your Hands on Me” providing the soundtrack to many people’s lives. In 1985, the band even performed at Live Aid at JFK Stadium in Philadelphia to a crowd of over 90,000 and an estimated global TV audience of 1.9 billion across 150 nations.

For the Retro Futura Tour, Bailey will be joined on stage by a backing band consisting of Amanda Kramer, Angie Pollock and Emily Dolan Davies. I had the pleasure of speaking with him about the Retro Futura Tour, his current projects as well as some of his best Thompson Twins memories.

How did you become involved in this year’s Retro Futura Tour?

My musical pursuits have taken me elsewhere for a long time and it’s actually been twenty-seven years since I’ve sung a Thompson Twins song. I guess I was getting used to the fact that it was just never going to happen. But then a few things changed that. Towards the end of last year, I was doing some work with a Mexican artist named Aleks Syntek. I remember we were writing a song together and Aleks encouraged me to sing on it. After not singing a pop song in all of this time, I decided to step over the boundary and take a risk with it. To my pleasure and surprise, I really enjoyed it.

It was also around the same time that Howard Jones [who had already been out on this tour last year] said that he’d like to do it again this year with me, but I still wasn’t totally convinced. To look at it honestly, I really needed to re-engage with the music. So I decided to re-record some of the songs to give me the opportunity to sing on them again. It felt so good that I knew the answer was going to be yes!

What can fans expect from your show?

Everything that I’ll be singing will be from that era of big, successful Thompson Twins. Originally, I had thought about going out and doing different interpretations of these well-known songs. Although it would be interesting, it would also be undermining because what the fans really want is an enormous whiff of nostalgia. At the same time though, that gives me the permission to do a few of the songs in a new way.

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Your band is made up of female musicians. Can you speak a little bit about that?

I take that as a positive sign of the times. Back in the eighties, we always tried to seek out a balance for the band in terms of male and female and it was very difficult. This time, it was very easy to find that the greatest players were women. It’s a completely different dynamic. The other thing about it is that we all come from several different generations of musicians. I’m 60 now and our drummer, Emily Dolan Davies wasn’t even born when these songs were written [laughs].

In your opinion, what made the 80′s so great?

It was a change in the sound of the music – and that was partly because of technology. It was a time when we were beginning to use keyboards and synthesizers to make entire records rather than just use them as a flavor. Then of course, there was the effect of MTV. An entire channel dedicated to music videos. There was nothing like it before and it changed everything.

The Thompson Twins performed at Live Aid in 1985. What was that experience like for you personally?

It was the most enormous thing. Especially when you’re told that you’re walking out on stage in front of 90,000 people but then realize that number is really small compared to the number of people who were actually watching it live around the world on TV. Joining together music with what it means to be alive in pursuit of a good cause really felt like the crowning glory for our generation of musicians. It was the most magnificent day.

This year marks the 30th anniversary of Thompson Twins’ “Into The Gap”. What are some of your best memories about making that album?

It was a very endurable process. By that point, we had become more confident and mature in our songwriting and arranging. We weren’t quite so “pure synth” with that album. We were using other instruments like guitar and piano and the vocal arrangements started becoming more complex. It was great fun. The other thing was that we had already finished the first single before we had even completed the rest of the album. So we had the excitement of watching the song “Hold Me Now” go up the charts while we were finishing up the rest of the record.

Can you tell me the origin of the song “Hold Me Now”?

I can’t remember exactly, although I know it was probably very real in the sense that perhaps Alannah and I had some kind of argument and reconciled. Then we decided to write a song about the process of getting back together again. Although it’s not something that actually occurred, it’s a song about how good and sentimental it feels to realize that the argument has passed and how great it is to be back in love.

What other projects are you currently working on?

I’ve been very busy with several projects. I’ve got a dub electronic band called International Observer, a north Indian classical group called The Holiwater Band and a teaching science through art astronomy project called The Bailey-Salgado Project, which I do with an astronomer in Chicago. We make films and music about the night sky and the universe. It’s a fun, educational thing we treat as art.

Are there any other moments in your career that stands out as most memorable?

There are lots of big gigs but I think more about the times where you feel the giddy sensation of “taking off”. The moment when you go from hoping that you’re doing something well to not believing how well it’s going to do. Those are the moments that you never forget, because they only happen once. It’s a crazy roller coaster ride that’s almost feels otherworldly. I treasure those moments.

Do you ever foresee a Thompson Twins reunion?

I can’t see that it’s likely. Joe and Alannah are both happy that I’m doing this tour, but are not interested in pursuing it themselves. When Thompson Twins split up, they both moved on into other areas of activity almost immediately; whereas I haven’t done anything else but music since. For them, it would be an enormous responsibility to become a musician again.

What excites you the most about the Retro Futura Tour?

It’s not about just going through the motion of what you were doing thirty years ago. I wouldn’t be interested in doing that. For me, it’s a completely vital experience. It’s profoundly emotional to sing these songs again and it brings back all sorts of memories. I’m looking forward to seeing familiar faces from people who were there the first time around as well as some people who weren’t. I’m so lucky to be able to do this.

Retro Futura Tour 2014:

AUGUST

21 New York, NY Best Buy Theater
22 Philadelphia, PA Keswick Theater
23 Brookhaven, NY Pennysaver Amphitheater
24 Boston, MA Wilbur Theatre
25 Cleveland, OH Performance Arts Center/The Cleveland Masonic Auditorium
26 Toronto, ON Koolhaus
27 Chicago, IL Ravinia
29 Los Angeles, CA The Greek Theater
30 Saratoga, CA Mountain Winery
31 Sacramento, CA Thunder Valley Casino

SEPTEMBER

3 Tempe, AZ Marquee Theatre
4 San Diego, CA Humphrey’s
5 Las Vegas, NV Mandalay Bay
6 Sandy, UT Sandy Amphitheater

Firehouse Guitarist Bill Leverty Releases New Song, ‘The Heart Heals the Soul’

Bill Leverty (Photo by: Sherry Boylan)

Bill Leverty (Photo by: Sherry Boylan)

Known for his role as lead guitarist/harmony vocalist in the multi-platinum selling, international recording group FireHouse, Bill Leverty has also been prolific as solo artist as well. Releasing four solo albums and multiple side projects – which includes the critically acclaimed “Flood The Engine”

Leverty’s new single, “The Heart Heals The Soul” continues the trend of infectious songwriting by showcasing his tasty guitar work and vocal prowess. The result is a tastefully blended blues-rock track combination that mixes nicely with Leverty’s own unique sound and vocal style.

Stylistically, Leverty is a genre bending, eclectic artist. “I love all kinds of music, and I believe that my audience does as well” he says. “I don’t want to be pigeon-holed or limited in any one style. I’ve got to write and record what I feel in order to be real to my fans. I write everything from rock to country, funk to bluegrass. If a song feels good to me, I’ll put in out in hopes that my supporters will spread the word.”

Check out the video for ‘The Heart Heals The Soul’ below…

With the handling of lead vocals, guitars, keyboards, engineering and production on his solo projects, it’s no surprise that Bill Leverty continues to prove he’s the complete artist.

Leverty and the rest of Firehouse (which includes CJ Snare, Michael Foster and Allen McKenzie) are also showing no signs of slowing down. In addition to having recently performed a sold-out show in Leverty’s hometown of Richmond, Virginia, the band is in the midst of another successful tour run that will include stops at Penns Peak in Jim Thorpe, PA and this year’s Firefest in the U.K.

“The Heart Heals The Soul” is available on iTunes, Amazon, CD Baby or directly from Leverty via his website.

For more on Bill Leverty be sure to check out his official website at www.leverty.com

‘Retro Futura’: Synth Pioneer Howard Jones Talks New Tour, The 80′s

Howard Jones (Photo: howardjones.com)

Howard Jones 1985 (Photo: howardjones.com)

Fans of 80’s new wave music, rejoice! This summer’s star-studded Retro Futura Tour promises to be one epic proportion! Kicking off this August, the co-headlining tour will feature synth pioneer Howard Jones and Thompson Twins’ Tom Bailey as well as sets from Ultravox’s Midge Ure, China Crisis and Katrina (ex-Katrina And The Waves). In addition to it being an extraordinary evening of live music, Retro Futura 2014 will also mark the first time Bailey will perform Thompson Twins hits live in nearly three decades!

Howard Jones first burst upon the scene in 1983 with his inspired songwriting and engaging synthesizers. His first album, “Human’s Lib” reached #1 in the UK and featured the hits “New Song” and “What Is Love?” Jones would follow-up his debut with 1985’s “Dream Into Action”, an album which quickly became a platinum best-seller in the United States with smash hits like “Things Can Only Get Better” “Life In One Day” and “No One Is To Blame”. To date, Jones has sold more than eight million albums worldwide and continues to make new music and tour the world.

I had the chance to speak with Jones about the upcoming Retro Futura tour, his music as well as some of his best 80s memories.

How did the idea for this year’s tour with Tom Bailey begin?

Last year, we tried out the idea of doing the tour and did ten dates, mainly on the west coast. Everyone had such a great time that we started thinking about who we would like to do it with this year. That was when the idea of Thompson Twins came up. I’ve known Tom for a long time, so I called him up and told him that it would be a great time. I guess it was my job to go and “persuade” him to come out – and he agreed.

Howard Jones 2014 (Photo: Duncan McGlynn)

Howard Jones 2014 (Photo: Duncan McGlynn)

Having played these songs for so many years, what do you do to keep things fresh?

I’ve always been able to do these songs in different ways and have also been evolving my set up. Our set does change and I also try to throw in some new things as well.

You’ve often mentioned that music from the 80’s faces a continuous struggle. Can you elaborate more on that?

Eighties music has had a bad rap for so long and as a result, it’s formed its own sub-culture. We now have huge festivals here in the UK every summer. I’m not sure if it’s the same in America, but we’re trying to change that!

What makes the music from that era so timeless and special?

I think that Eighties music really combined the arts and fashion more. Back then, everyone was thinking in a more visual way – especially with videos. It brought about a change in culture that wasn’t really so “rock n roll” as much as music in the 60’s and 70’s had been. That’s why it’s unique and why people who grew up during that era are very loyal to it.

Let’s discuss a few of your 80’s moments. In 1985, you performed at Live Aid. What was that experience like?

It was an amazing experience and a lot of money really did save people’s lives. I was obviously very nervous, because there were 100,000 people in Wembley and a billion people watching it on TV. I also performed solo at the piano, which was something people weren’t really used to hearing me do.

I came out and sat there and played the song “Hide and Seek” which is one of my favorite songs I’ve ever written. I remember when I got to the chorus, everyone joined in and supported me and started singing at the top of their voices. It was a profound experience and something that I’ll never forget. It was probably the most important event in my life during the eighties.

Can you tell me where you came up with the inspiration for the song “No One Is To Blame”?

I was doing some radio promotion with a record company guy in San Francisco. I remember he said to me “So, Howard? What do you think of all of the amazing women we have here in San Francisco?” I said “Yeah, they’re fantastic! But I’m really happily married to my wife Jan. We’ve been together ever since we were young, so I’m good in that area.” That’s when he said “Well, you can look at the menu but you don’t have to EAT!”…. That was it! That was the spark! I guess I should really thank him for it! [laughs].

Can you tell me a little about your musical upbringing?

Music has been in my blood ever since I was two years old. I started playing piano at the age of seven; was in bands at fourteen and got signed when I was twenty-eight. It’s really been music all the way. But even if I didn’t have music, I’d still be happy with who I am. If you were to take it all away I’d still feel good about life.

What other projects are you working on?

I’ve got a new project that I performed last November called ‘Engage’. It’s written as a live piece that integrates contemporary dance, ballet and cinematic soundscapes. It’s everything that I love, along with some philosophical themes. It’s a big project I’m in the final mixes of that will be out next year.

We spoke about your performance at Live Aid but are there any other moments from that era that stand out to you?

There were actually two. I remember one of them was doing the Grammy awards. I’ve never won a Grammy, but I was in something that was just as good. I was in a band with Stevie Wonder, Thomas Dolby and Herbie Hancock that performed together at the show. It was such a great moment. The other thing was getting to play Madison Square Garden, which was something that I had always dreamed of doing as a teenager. I got to do my own show there and it was absolutely amazing.

You took a lot of heat back in the 80’s for being a keyboard and synth pioneer. What are your thoughts on that now?

It’s amazing how much things have changed. Today, people have that stuff in their bedrooms and can even make records at home. I see it more as a badge of honor now, especially with the way music has evolved and developed and with the way people use technology and really see it for what it is. Back then, I didn’t want to be like the status quo. I wanted to do something that was different and unique. That’s why I was always drawn to technology, because it gives you the chance to do something new.

For more on Howard Jones: www.howardjones.com

Retro Futura Tour 2014:

AUGUST

21 New York, NY Best Buy Theater
22 Philadelphia, PA Keswick Theater
23 Brookhaven, NY Pennysaver Amphitheater
24 Boston, MA Wilbur Theatre
25 Cleveland, OH Performance Arts Center/The Cleveland Masonic Auditorium
26 Toronto, ON Koolhaus
27 Chicago, IL Ravinia
29 Los Angeles, CA The Greek Theater
30 Saratoga, CA Mountain Winery
31 Sacramento, CA Thunder Valley Casino

SEPTEMBER

3 Tempe, AZ Marquee Theatre
4 San Diego, CA Humphrey’s
5 Las Vegas, NV Mandalay Bay
6 Sandy, UT Sandy Amphitheater

Guitar World: Asia’s John Wetton and Sam Coulson Talk New Album, ‘Gravitas’

Asia: Gravitas (2014)

Asia: Gravitas (2014)

Following Steve Howe’s departure from Asia in 2012, the band launched a massive search in hopes of finding a suitable replacement for the legendary guitarist.

Enter Sam Coulson, a young gun recommended by Paul Gilbert. And by “young,” we mean someone who wasn’t even born during Asia’s first wave of success in the Eighties.

Coulson’s arrival brings a youthful energy and new-found technical savvy to Asia, whose eponymous 1982 debut sold more than 7 million copies and included the hits “Heat of the Moment,” “Only Time Will Tell” and “Sole Survivor.”

Asia (l to r: Carl Palmer, John Wetton, Geoff Downes, Sam Coulson

Asia (l to r: Carl Palmer, John Wetton, Geoff Downes, Sam Coulson

Asia’s new album, Gravitas, features Coulson’s guitar work coupled with the vision of producer/songwriting partners John Wetton and Geoff Downes. The result is a new twist for the band that tastefully complements the classic Asia sound.

Asia — John Wetton (vocals, bass), Geoff Downes (keyboards), Carl Palmer (drums) and Sam Coulson (guitar) — are preparing a fall U.S tour to showcase the new album and introduce their new guitarist.

I recently spoke with Wetton and Coulson about Gravitas and more.

You can read the rest of my
gw_logoInterview with John Wetton & Sam Coulson
By Clicking Here!

Slam Dunk!: Gerald Albright Scores Big With Compelling New Album

Gerald Albright“Slam Dunk” is an apropos title. With a direct influence of James Brown as well as the Philly International and Motown sound, Gerald Albright’s infectious new album delivers the goods by taking us on a journey of musical discovery.

Co-produced by Chris “Big Dog” Davis, “Slam Dunk” continues Albright’s reign as one of the most compelling and consistent artists in jazz. In addition to showcasing his amazing sax prowess, Albright displays his skills as bassist and vocalist on “Slam Dunk”, with ebullient arrangements of classic covers as well as his own compositions.

Highlights on “Slam Dunk” include Albright’s take on songs by James Brown (“It’s a Man’s, Man’s Man’s World”) and Phil Collins (“True Colors”) as well as his own touching tribute to longtime friend George Duke (“The Duke”). If that’s not enough, Albright even brings in special guest vocalist Peabo Bryson for an impassioned performance on the track “Where Did We Go Wrong”.

“Slam Dunk” will be released on August 5th. I had the pleasure of speaking with Albright about his wonderful new album.

Where does the title “Slam Dunk” come from?

Well, it’s not a basketball term [laughs]. It’s a bit more cliché’. It’s about being at a good point in your life when everything is kind of clicking. The premise behind this whole project was to take some of the instruments that I’ve loved to play for many years and bring them to the forefront. The bass guitar, the flute solos, the little singing that I do – and of course, all of the saxophones. It’s a project where I really got to spread my wings, and “Slam Dunk” is a title that reflects that.

What was your criteria for choosing songs to cover for this album?

For me, the song has to feel good and have a wonderful melody that I can play on the saxophone. If it translates well to the sax then I’ll really feel the tune as opposed to trying to make a melody work from a particular song.

Let’s discuss a few tracks from Slam Dunk. “True Colors”

I used to perform “True Colors” back when I was on the road with Phil Collins. He did a wonderful arrangement of it. I had a featured soprano sax solo during his show and always looked forward to doing that song. I remember making a mental note at the time that if I ever had a chance to do my own rendition of it I would do it. We did it for this album.

Tell me a little about your James Brown influence and particularly on the song, “It’s a Man’s Man’s Man’s World.

I’ve been channeling James Brown for years. In fact, on all of my contemporary projects you’ll hear hints of James somewhere within one or more of the songs. That’s because as early as age 8, I was literally listening to every recorded album of James Brown that my brother had playing in the household. It was what I was digesting on a daily basis. Of course, with James being so funky and then having Maceo Parker who was just as funky playing alto – that became my first influence on the alto saxophone. James plays a big part in my musical journey and I wanted to do “Man’s World” because it’s one of those tunes that you can slow down, dig into and really have a conversation with the horn. I think we were very successful..

“Because of You”.

That was a song I wrote with my co-producer, Chris “Big Dog” Davis. It was a song that I dedicated to my wife and one where I’m doing all of the background vocals. I get to channel George Duke and his falsetto on that one!

Speaking of George Duke, you pay tribute to him on the song “The Duke”.

I affectionately called him Poppa G. George was someone you could always approach and he would always give you time. He was a real special spirit in the music business that made you feel comfortable whenever you were around him. I had a chance to record and play live shows with George and he really influenced me in my music and as a person for many years. I deeply miss him and wanted to give him a tribute on the project. We did that song for Duke.

“Where Did We Go Wrong” – With Peabro Bryson.

I was doing the Berks Jazz Festival. Peabro was also there and I remember there was a point in the show where I was standing in the wings and was just amazed at how wonderful his voice is. He hasn’t lost a beat and I thought it would be great to have him on this new record. After the show, we were both back in the dressing room and I asked him if he’d be willing to do a song on the album and he said “Absolutely”. He did a wonderful job.

What was it like working with Chris “Big Dog” Davis?

‘Big Dog’ brought a new energy to this project that was really exciting. He’s one of those user-friendly types of producers who can really do any type of music. We pretty much co-wrote and produced the whole album together. I’m so happy with the way it came out.

Will you also be touring to support this album?

Yes! We’re talking about major touring at the end of the year and into 2015. We definitely have to tour on Slam Dunk. I wouldn’t have it any other way.

You also have some more dates lined up with Summer Horns. What’s it like touring with Dave Koz, Mindi Abair and Richard Elliott?

It’s exciting to share the stage with Koz, Mindi and Richard. It’s a mutual admiration type of platform. We always have a lot of fun on stage together and I think people can really zone in on that.

Did you always know music would be your calling?

I did. Music was the only thing that ever really made me feel comfortable. I’ve always geared my energy towards some path of music. Whether it was being in the recording studio with other artists, out on the road or doing my own solo projects – music is home for me. I started out on piano when I was eight years old. I didn’t like it so my private teacher put me on saxophone and thank God that he did because that was the instrument that I was inclined to play.

What makes jazz such a great form of music?

It’s the timeless, American art form. You can put on a Nat King Cole or Miles Davis record and it would sound like it was recorded yesterday. There’s an allegiance and commitment to this music that’s unlike any other genre.

What advice would you give to someone starting out who has dreams of a career in music?

First and foremost, you really have to be fluent on the instrument. There are no shortcuts and that means you have to practice and put in the time. Music is also a relationship business, so you’ve got to go where the action is. Refine your instrument and then refine the business aspect to develop relationships with people who can help you enhance it. You can always learn something today that you didn’t know yesterday. It’s limitless what you can do.

For more on Gerald Albright check out his official website: http://geraldalbright.com/

 

LA Sessions: 14-Year-Old Ray Goren Talks New EP and Working with Jimi Hendrix Producer Eddie Kramer

RayGoren2Fourteen-year-old guitarist Ray Goren describes LA Sessions, his new EP, as a unique mixture of everything from Jimi Hendrix to Stevie Wonder. Considering the fact that Hendrix’s producer, Eddie Kramer, worked on the EP, it’s hard to argue.

Goren’s guitar journey is slightly different from that of most players. He started out on keyboards, playing songs by Thelonious Monk, J.J. Johnson and Miles Davis as early as age 5.

But it wasn’t until a few years later while searching YouTube that he stumbled upon a video clip of B.B. King, Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Buddy Guy and Albert Collins performing together. That’s when the fuse was lit, and Goren has never looked back.

Kramer, who “discovered” Goren, has a resume that includes such giants as Led Zeppelin and Kiss. The legendary producer/engineer was so impressed with Goren that he produced LA Sessions himself and even enlisted some other musical heavyweights, including drummer Able Laboriel, Jr. (Paul McCartney) and bassist Paul Bushnell (Tim McGraw) to lend a hand.

Read the rest of my
gw_logoInterview with Ray Goren by Clicking Here!

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