Category: Interview

The Bangles’ Vicki Peterson Talks New Album, Saluting the Paisley Underground

Photo: Autumn de Wilde

It was the dawn of the Eighties when the Bangles (then known as the Bangs), the Dream Syndicate, the Three O’Clock and Rain Parade were all new L.A. bands at the core of the influential Paisley Underground scene.

Five years ago, the four groups got back together for a charity event that went over so well they decided to do something unique to celebrate their success. They each got to work putting their own spin on one song from each of the other three bands. The result is a new 12-song collection, titled 3 x 4: The Bangles, The Three O’Clock, The Dream Syndicate, Rain Parade, which will be released on purple swirl vinyl, double LP and CD for Black Friday Record Store Day on November 23, with a wider release coming early next year.

Guitar World recently spoke with Bangles guitarist Vicki Peterson about the new album and more.

What inspired this new project? How did it all come about?

The record is a delayed outgrowth of a reunion we did a few years back. We all got together, Rain Parade, Dream Syndicate, the Three O’Clock and the Bangs, and did a series of shows in San Francisco and L.A. We had so much fun reconnecting that a week later, I was talking with Danny Benair (The Three O’Clock) and Steve Wynn (Dream Syndicate) about doing an album. But instead of recording new material, we thought a sweet project would be for each band to pick a song from the other three bands and cover it. It was a nice way to pay tribute to each other.

Who coined the phrase “Paisley Underground”?

It’s generally credited to Mike Quercio (The Three O’Clock). He was sitting down for an interview and someone asked him to describe what was going on and what the common thread was and he said, “We’re the Paisley Underground.” It was a movement and certainly not mainstream music. At the time, it was the early Eighties in Los Angeles. Punk was winding down and there was a rockabilly scene. All of us shared a common reverence for the music of the mid-Sixties to early Seventies. It was very contrite, and “paisley” really kind of says it best.

I want to ask you about the tracks the Bangles covered for the new album, starting with the Three O’Clock’s “Jet Fighter.” What can you tell me about it?

Generally, it’s the most pop tune on the album. It’s got such a catchy chorus and a great feel. It was one of the songs that when I heard it again sparked a lot of happy memories of going to Three O’Clock shows.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Vicki Peterson by Clicking Here!

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Interview: Ted Nugent discusses his new album, ‘The Music Made Me Do It’, career

Photo: Brown Photography

Over the course of his illustrious career, Ted Nugent has carved a permanent place in rock history. To date, the guitar legend and Motor City Madman has sold more than forty million albums and performed just shy of seven thousand shows.

On Nov. 9 Nugent, along with bass virtuoso Greg Smith and drummer Jason Hartless, will release a brand-new album, aptly titled, The Music Made Me Do It. As an added bonus, each CD will include a full-length concert DVD, “Live At Freedom Hill,” captured at the Freedom Hill Amphitheatre in Sterling Heights, Michigan in 2017. To tease the new album and raw energy of his live concert experience, Nugent has also released a video for the album’s title track that was shot at the Canyon Club in Agoura Hills, CA.

AXS recently spoke with Nugent about The Music Made Me Do It, his career and more in this exclusive new interview.

AXS: How did this project come about? What inspired it?

Ted Nugent: It’s not about spurts of inspiration. It’s about constant inspiration. I’m inspired every day I grab a Gibson guitar and go into uncharted territory. I figured out my American freedom and individuality a long time ago. When I’m outdoors and removed from music and the clusterf#ck of politics it cleanses my soul. We all need to escape, but that’s not to say we need to abandon responsibility. I’m so engaged in this beloved experiment in self-government and I raise as much hell in this guitar playing, we the people as I possibly can. I fight for the Constitution, Bill of Rights and freedom, and to raise the battle cry of “America First”. That’s why my music is the most soul cleansing, nature-is-healer, rhythm and blues, rock and roll groove fest.

AXS: What’s your writing process like?

TN: I’ve never in my life sat down with a pen and paper and said, “Hmm. What shall I write a song about today?” [laughs]. F#ck that! I just pick up my guitar and start pounding and create more bastard children of honky tonk and boogie-woogie. My hands start moving and I sing lyrics that are my life. It’s almost out-of-body. I’ve never contemplated chord structures or lyrics. I just love to go on adventures on the guitar neck.

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Interview with Ted Nugent by Clicking here!

Steve Lukather Discusses His New Autobiography, ‘The Gospel According to Luke’

In his new autobiography, The Gospel According to Luke, guitarist Steve Lukather tells the story of how he and his high school friends became the most in-demand session players in L.A., and then went on to form Toto, a band that continues to defy the odds and has sold more than 40 million albums.

Co-written with Paul Rees, Lukather’s biography is an engaging, hilarious and at times tender look into the life of one of music’s most accomplished guitarists and session players. His list of musical achievements alone are enough to fill an entire book. The five-time Grammy winner (and eight-time nominee) has worked with everyone from Boz Scaggs and Paul McCartney to Aretha Franklin and Miles Davis. He was once asked to join Elton John’s touring band and played guitar on Michael Jackson’s Thriller – the biggest selling album of all time. Then there’s his personal, brotherly relationship with the Porcaro brothers and Toto, and all of the highs and lows in between.

The Gospel According to Luke is more than a time capsule of life, love and redemption. It’s a treasure trove of information for anyone wondering what it was like being in the studio and working alongside some of the greatest artists, producers and engineers in music history.

Guitar World recently spoke with Lukather about his new book, session work, gear and more.

What made you decide to write a book about your life and career? Was it something you always thought about doing?

I originally wasn’t looking to do a book at all. A few years ago I got invited to the Grammy Museum to do a Q&A with Scott Goldman. It was one of those interviews where he asked me questions about my whole career, and I didn’t know what was coming. I remember the room was packed and as I was talking, people were howling in the aisles, laughing at all of my stories. When I came offstage, my agents came up to me and said, “You have got to write a book.” From there, I started getting calls from publishers and it morphed out of that. We spent a few years doing it, editing and rewriting. It was hard because there’s a lot of life I remember clearly, and a lot where they told me I had a good time! [laughs]

What was the writing process like?

It was very cathartic and brought back a lot of memories, both good and bad. The session years, in particular, brought back a lot great memories. Those were wonderful times for me.

How did you become involved in session work?

My father saw being a pro musician as something more attainable than a rock star. I played by ear from the ages of seven to 14 and then took proper lessons. From that point, I met the Porcaro brothers. Both they and their father were session players. I started reading liner notes and following all of the great studio guitar players I looked up to, like, Lee Ritenour, Larry Carlton, Jay Graydon and Ray Parker Jr. I also happened to be geographically placed where I could actually meet these guys. Jeff [Porcaro] knew them all because Jeff was in Steely Dan when we were in high school.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Steve Lukather by Clicking Here!

Interview: Smithfield’s Trey Smith and Jennifer Fielder talk music, touring

Photo: Jason Myers

With hook-laden melodies, clever songwriting and rich harmonies, the partnership of Trey Smith and Jennifer Fielder (Smithfield) are fast becoming one of Nashville’s most in-demand acts. The duo, whose family connection spans three generations, defines their music as an infectious blend of rock and pop mixed with traditional country.

Smithfield spent the year as part of the Granger Smith tour before hitting the festival circuit this past summer. Now the pair has embarked on their first nationwide radio tour promoting their latest single, “Our World.”  But don’t expect Smith and Fielder to slow down and hibernate over the long winter months. The duo plans to hit the studio again to record more new music to be released early in the New Year.

AXS recently spoke with Smith and Fielder about Smithfield and more in this exclusive new interview.

AXS: How did the two of you come together to form Smithfield?

Jennifer Fielder: Trey and I have known each other since we were about ten years old. Our families go back three generations, so our grandparents and parents all knew each other. Growing up, our families did parties together and Trey and I met at one of our New Year’s Eve parties. As far as how we formed Smithfield, even though Trey and I knew each other, we grew up singing separately. I was doing country music in college when Trey’s rock band had broken up. He reached out to me and the two of us got together. That’s when we discovered our voices blended perfectly together. It was fate that we were meant to sing together, and our journey began from there.

AXS: How would you describe your sound?

Trey Smith: I come from a rock background and Jen comes from a more traditional, country background. But our sound is really focused on our harmonies. I like to say that it’s a rock and pop mix that’s rooted in country music.

AXS: How does your songwriting process work?

JF: Sometimes it starts with an idea, title, or a melody that Trey has on his guitar. Other times, our co-writer will have a great idea and we can latch on and tell the story. Sometimes we may just be chatting in the room about life and an idea will come out of that. You can never plan to write a great song. It just happens.

AXS: What can you tell me about your recent single, “Our World?”

TS: One of the great things about Nashville is that there are so many great songs being written every day. “Our World” was a song that was pitched to us by a friend. When a song connects with you and can bring out an emotion, it’s something you want to cut. This was one of those situations where we knew it was a Smithfield song the moment we heard it.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Smithfield by Clicking Here!

Interview: John Schneider discusses ‘Dancing With The Stars’, new music and downloadable App

For the multi-talented singer-songwriter, actor (and dancer), John Schneider, telling stories is in his DNA. The same can also be said for his amazingly talented and beautiful “Dancing With The Stars” partner, Emma Slater. The couple’s innate ability to weave deep layers of emotion into their routine is a big reason why they’ve done so well on the popular ABC series this season.

As Schneider continues his whirlwind run in the competition, he’s also busy promoting his new music single, “Devil In The Mirror,” as well as his John Schneider App. A portal which gives fans access to all of his events and social media as well as a one-stop shop for his music and merchandise.

AXS recently spoke with Schneider about what it’s like being on “Dancing With The Stars”, his new single and more in this exclusive new interview.

AXS: What’s it been like working with Emma Slater this season on “Dancing With The Stars?”

John Schneider: It’s been great. Emma’s a storyteller, just like me. Once we started to gel, she started thinking about songs where we could tell great stories. She really went out of her way to find the right song, the right movement and mood for “Smile” (our recent dance) so that we could tell the story about me missing my mother but finding my smile at the same time. It’s not always about the dancing. It’s about what you’re saying, and telling stories is in her soul.

AXS: What’s the biggest thing you’ve learned about dancing?

JS: All of them are different, so it’s about technique and frame. You’ve got to keep your frame rigid and that boils down to keeping your elbows up, especially in the Waltz. You have to look like you have a broom handle stretching elbow to elbow straight across your back. It always feels like I’m doing it but when I look back at the video my elbows are not up. For me, it’s a lot like golf. If you get too comfortable with your swing, chances are it’s wrong.

AXS: How does dancing in front of so many people compare to performing music or acting?

JS: The assumption everyone has is that the nerves kick in when you get to Monday night and all of the people, but that’s actually when I feel most comfortable. In this case, comfort is really not my friend because comfort equals “elbows down”. But what we did this past Monday night was beautiful. I know this because they have about a hundred stagehands constantly moving stuff around and working their butts off. After our dance, I noticed several of them were crying. That to me is more important than technique. I’m not designed to be a perfect, technical dancer. I’m designed to connect to an audience. So, when I see a 52-year-old man in a black t-shirt crying underneath a light after I did a dance, I know I did something important and touched someone. Our job is to entertain and make you feel something for a certain amount of time, and for that I’m grateful.

Read the rest of my
Interview with John Schneider by Clicking Here!

Interview: Gin Blossoms’ Robin Wilson discusses the band’s new album, ‘Mixed Reality’

Photo: Shervin Lainez

It’s hard to believe that it’s been more than twenty-five years since Gin Blossoms’ monstrous breakthrough album, New Miserable Experience. A record which was a much-needed alternative to the flavor of the week pablum and grunge scene and featured the hits “Hey Jealousy,” “Until I Fall Away,” “Found Out About You,” and “Allison Road.” Perhaps nothing captures that same spirited sentiment better in 2018 than the band’s brand new album, Mixed Reality.

Produced by the legendary Don Dixon, Mixed Reality features the jangle influence Dixon made famous on early albums by REM and The Smithereens. At the same time, vocalist Robin Wilson’s lyrics and delivery on tracks like “Break,” and “Face The Dark” are infectiously reminiscent of the band’s early days but also show a deeper level of musical maturity. A testament to a band who, even after a quarter of a century, still has a lot left to say.

AXS recently spoke with Robin Wilson about the new Gin Blossoms album, Mixed Reality, memorable moments, touring and more in this exclusive new interview.

AXS: It’s been eight years since the band’s last album, No Chocolate Cake. What inspired Mixed Reality?

Robin Wilson: Motivation. It had been too long and we were anxious to record again and do something to propel our career. Mixed Reality is a companion to New Miserable Experience and an album I feel we would’ve wanted to make in 1990.

AXS What was it like having Don Dixon produce Mixed Reality?

RW: It was very exciting. Don Dixon [and Mitch Easter] recorded the first two REM records. Those were at the core of our influences as a band. I remember when we went into the songwriting, I felt very connected to my twenty-year-old self when I was listening to REM, The Smithereens and those records that inspired us.

AXS: What’s your songwriting process like? 

RW: Generally, I keep a notebook of lyric ideas and when I come up with a melody, I’ll look through my list to see what leans into it. For a few of the songs on this album, I sat down with the guitar and wrote the melody and lyrics at the same time. A good example of that is the song, “Break.” I had that verse and chorus of that song within about ten minutes. It took a few weeks to add the bridge and refine it a little, but once I felt like I was onto something I became confident in the material.

AXS: What can you tell me about the track, “Face The Dark?”

RW: I had originally written that song thinking it was going to be about the end of my marriage. But once I had it pretty well wrapped up, it felt more like it was either about, to, or from Doug Hopkins, our original guitar player. Having already been thinking of REM and the records Don and Mitch had made, it was really easy to think about Doug too and some of my memories of him.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Robin Wilson by Clicking Here!

Interview: Bassist Trevor Horn Discusses His Role in Dire Straits Legacy tour, career milestones

DSL (Dire Straits Legacy) is an experience and celebration of the Grammy-Award winning British rockers’ music. It’s an evolving contingent that features former members of Dire Straits – Alan Clark (piano/keyboards), Danny Cummings (percussion), Mel Collins (saxophone) and Phil Palmer (guitar/musical director). Other renowned musicians, including drummer Steve Ferrone (Tom Petty), bassist Trevor Horn (The Buggles, Yes), Marco Caviglia (vocals/guitar) and Primiano DiBiase (keyboards) have also joined in various stages to tour and record.

The contingent, which has already toured Europe and South America and released their first original album, 3 Chord Trick, late last year, is now embarked on a U.S. tour that will run through mid-October. The tour gives longtime fans the opportunity of hearing hits like “Sultans of Swing,” “Walk of Life,” “Romeo & Juliet,” and the quintessential MTV classic, “Money For Nothing,” performed live for the first time in decades.

AXS recently spoke with bassist Trevor Horn about the tour, his career and more in this exclusive new interview.

AXS: How did you become involved in the DSL project?

Trevor Horn: I became involved last year because one of the guitar players was someone I use a lot on my records. He told me the band was doing some gigs in Brazil and needed someone on the bass. It’s been an interesting experience and has made me have a lot more respect for Mark Knopfler as a writer.

AXS: What do you think makes the music of Dire Straits so special?

TH: I can tell you straight off. The lyrics are real and the playing is terrific. Just the way Mark Knopfler writes; he takes things a lot of people use and turns them on their head in a really good way. Obviously, his guitar playing is great too.

AXS: What’s next for the group after this run of U.S. shows?

TH: We’ll be off to do some shows in Bucharest and Italy. I’ll also be doing a show with my own band in November at the Royal Queen Elizabeth Hall.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Trevor Horn by Clicking Here!