Category: Women Who Rock

Interview: Katrina Stone Discusses Overcoming Intellectual Property Theft, New Music

During her more than ten year tenure as a professional independent music artist, Katrina Stone’s tireless work ethic and inspirationally-driven songs have earned her legions of loyal fans and international acclaim. Her performances on stages like The Warped Tour and CityWalk Hollywood have wowed audiences and her songs have recieved placement and endorsements in both television and film. But it wasn’t until one of those loyal fans tipped her off about her music being illegally posted online that the beautiful songstress took matters into her own hands.

Stone quickly discovered that twenty-six of her early tracks were actively being promoted on streaming services by fraudulent accounts using slight name changes and different covers to fool audiences. After the streaming companies offered no help, Stone learned the tracks were being offered through DistroKid and, upon inquiry, the company did the right thing by quickly shutting down the fraudulent accounts.

Now, Stone is using the experience to warn other indie artists about the importance of keeping tabs on their music. She’s also hard at work on a brand-new album that’s scheduled for release in May.

I recently spoke with Katrina Stone about the incident, her music and more in this exclusive new interview.

How did this whole situation come about?

Katrina Stone: I was aware that there had been some fake accounts on Spotify where people would upload tracks but didn’t think much of it beyond that. Then one day, a fan reached out to me on Instagram to let me know that she found some of my earlier tracks in her Discover Weekly that were listed under a different name and with different covers. I started digging a little and realized that they not only compromised my material but there were more than thirty-six other indie artists who weren’t coming up as the artist that was listed. When you put your heart and soul into creating music it’s scary that people see it as a commodity and just steal it.

How does something like this happen?

KS: My music was pulled off Noise Trade, but it’s also possible to steal it by ripping mp3’s from YouTube or directly from CDs. These fake accounts then give the tracks a slightly different title and cover and upload it. The track’s usually live in about twenty-four hours.

How receptive were some of the streaming services when you told them about it?

KS: They weren’t very receptive at all. They wanted me to fill out a copyright complaint form for each purpose and song. That would have meant filing hundreds of copyright complaints. To make things worse, the person we believe was doing this lived out of the country. So there was really no way to track them down. As an indie artist, I’d prefer to create music than to be putting out so many fires. So, what I did was find the tracks on YouTube, where it listed the labels they were under. When I saw it was Distro Kit I reached out to them directly and they were so helpful. Within forty-eight hours they let me know that it was going to be pulled down.

Having gone through this experience, what advice would you give to other artists?

KS: Since the streaming companies really won’t help you, I encourage people to periodically go on sites and search for their songs. Listen to them and make sure they’re really yours. Another thing is to only share direct links to your Spotify and have them everywhere.

What can you tell me about your upcoming album?

KS: It’s inspirational pop and something I’ve wanted to do for quite a while. It’ll be the first time I’ll be writing, producing, engineering and playing everything. It’s real, vulnerable and honest and a chance for me to show exactly what I’ve got. I’m very excited about it.

What’s your songwriting process like?

KS: If I’m writing by myself, it’s lyrics first. I love the marriage between lyric and melody but when I’m writing ideas down I like to have something to sing first and then work on finding the right hook. It’s all about great craftsmanship, a lack of clichés and creating something that’s new and fresh.

Who are some of your musical influences?

KS: I don’t sing country but I’m a huge Garth Brooks fan. I love him as a performer and how he isn’t afraid to take someone else’s song and put his own take on it. I also love how classic Adele’s music is. It’s something you can listen to years later and still hear different things.

Was a career in music something you always envisioned?

KS: Yes. From the time I was around twelve years old the idea started to form in my head. It’s a tough industry but I’ve been fortunate to have been able to make a living at it. At this point, it’s all I know.

What excites you the most about this next phase of your career?

KS: I’m excited about this new album and tour and to start homing in on what is that I want. Everything is coming full circle, and I’m in a really good place.

‘The Best Thing’: Singer-Songwriter Phoebe Silva Discusses Her Infectious Debut Single

Phoebe Silva

For Phoebe Silva, there’s no time like the present. That’s why the beautiful singer-songwriter, who’s been harnessing her musical prowess for years as an in-demand session player in L.A.’s indie music scene, decided to branch out into the world as a solo artist. Showcasing her charisma and sultry vocal with the release of an infectious debut single, “The Best Thing.”

The song is a timeless, big band throwback with a summery feel and nineties vibe. A track that features Silva’s big vocal soaring with confidence and self-expression. Crooning about female empowerment while ushering in a ubiquitous combination of retro-pop, blues and soul.

Silva will officially unveil her debut single to the world with a single release party on Monday, December 2 at The Hi-Hat in Los Angeles. I recently spoke with her about “The Best Thing” and more in this exclusive new interview.

How did your single, “The Best Thing” come about?

Phoebe Silva: I was working as a post-production assistant a few years ago and was seeing this guy who was well known around the L.A. music scene. He was so confusing because he was the kind of guy who made you feel special one minute and the next minute he’d be blowing you off and talking to other girls. One night, I was at work and the chorus just popped into my head. The lyrics just flowed out of me. It’s a song about female empowerment and became the catalyst for me to start writing and making music as a solo artist. The seed had been planted and was starting to grow.

What is your songwriting process?

PS: I almost always start with lyrics. Ideas will usually pop into my head every day and I’ll always jot them down. Sometimes the inspiration will be lyrics for an entire song and other times it might just be a phrase or two. If it’s a phrase, I’ll let it gestate for a while and then go back through my notes and stitch things together. It’s lyrics first with melodies usually attached to them.

How would you describe your sound?

PS: The theme I’ve settled on is retro-pop, but there’s a lot more to it. Some things are more folk and blues and others are more pop with a heavy jazz influence. I grew up in musical theater; listening to oldies, sixties rock, Motown, girl groups and early twentieth century songwriting. I also grew up in the nineties, so I was a huge fan of artists like Fiona Apple, Sarah McLaughlin and Jewel.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Phoebe Silva by Clicking Here!

Interview: Actress Katie Callaway Discusses Her Versatile Career

It’s not often you meet a woman with the trifecta success of musical theater, film and television, but such is the case for Katie Callaway.

The beautiful actress began her journey studying classical ballet before attending Belmont University and graduating with a BFA in Musical Theatre. During her time there, Callaway appeared in no less than six different musical productions, including the first ever collegiate production of “Les Misérables.” She also wrote, directed, and starred in her senior thesis production of a one-act comedic musical parody of “The Hunger Games.”

With a powerful vocal equaled only by her acting prowess and charm, Callaway served as a key participant in several master classes and workshops by such notable Broadway influences as Jason Robert Brown (“The Last Five Years,” “Songs for a New World”), Benj Pasek & Justin Paul (“Edges,” “Dogfight,” and “A Christmas Story”) and Jen Waldman (Artistic Director at the Hangar Theatre and a part of the Original Broadway Cast of “Wicked”).

As a film and television actress, Callaway’s impressive list of credits includes a recurring role on ABC / Lionsgate’s “Nashville,” as well as being featured in films like “The Clapper” and “Prize Fighter.” She’s also branched out into commercial work and music videos as well. Her latest film, “Inheritance,” is slated for release in 2020.

I recently spoke with Katie Callaway about her career and life in this exclusive new interview.

Did you always know that you wanted to have a career in the arts and entertainment?

Katie Callaway: Absolutely. I’ve always loved performing and the theater and stage. I started really young in life studying classical ballet, and didn’t think being an actress could be a viable career until I was in my pre-teens. That’s when I asked my mom and dad to get me an agent and some head shots. I remember they were a little hesitant at first, but it’s always been on my radar and something that I loved to do. Following your passion and dreams isn’t selfish. It’s a responsibility.

What was it that attracted you to theater?

KC: I’m a big fan of stories and being able to have that one on one, call and response connection with an audience when something beautiful or dramatic happens on stage. There’s something magical about live theater and having an intimate relationship with the people you’re performing for.

You’ve done live theater, movies, commercials and television. As an actress, what are some of the similarities and differences?

KC: They’re all different but it’s all the art of performance. The beauty about live theater is the adrenaline rush you get knowing you only have one shot to get it right. Every night is completely different. In film or TV commercials you might do the take a few times, but once it’s locked in you can put it to bed. You can do a live show twenty to thirty times and still find new ways of falling in love with the character.

Are there any projects you’re currently working on?

KC: I recently filmed an episode of “General Hospital” that aired this past July, which was very exciting. I also have a supporting role in a thriller starring Lily Collins and Simon Pegg called “Inheritance” that’s slated to be released in 2020. There are a few other exciting things coming up that I can’t really discuss except to say stay tuned!

What’s the biggest lesson you’ve learned about yourself as an artist so far?

KC: It’s hard to pick just one thing but I find out more about myself as an artist by the characters I portray. The arts are about questioning the status quo, relying on things that have happened in the past, thinking about what lies ahead and then using the art of storytelling to share it.

What excites you the most about this next phase of your career?

KC: One thing I’m looking forward to is the opportunity to travel for different roles. It’s nice that the hub doesn’t always have to be L.A. anymore. I’m excited to get more stamps on my passport and seeing different parts of the world.

What’s the best bit of advice you can give to someone who may just be starting out?

KC: Keep your foot on the gas. If it’s something you feel called to do then don’t let anyone tell you that you can’t. It’s a viable career for anyone as long as you’re willing to put in the hard work. There’s a lot to be said for talent and networking but at the end of the day it’s all about perseverance. Always work to better your skillset and self as a human being. We need to follow the things we’re called to do.

Interview: Savannah Outen Discusses Her Infectious New Single, ‘The Hard Way’

In the years since Savannah Outen’s began her artistic journey at the age of fifteen the beautiful songstress has found unprecedented musical success. For, in addition to becoming a fixture on the Radio Disney charts her ubiquitous renditions of various cover songs have garnered her more than 120 million views on YouTube.

Last year, Outen’s hauntingly ethereal track, “Sad In The Summer” spoke about letting go of the past and finding freedom. With her infectious new track, “The Hard Way,” the beautiful artist has managed to discover something else — a sound like no other.

Not only does “The Hard Way” feature Outen’s hook-laden melodies and distinctly powerful vocal prowess but the track showcases a deep level of emotional artistic maturity, proving that she’s becoming an even bigger force to be reckoned with.

I recently spoke with Outen about “The Hard Way,” songwriting and more in this exclusive new interview.

How did the new single, “The Hard Way,” originate?

Savannah Outen: For this track, I was in the studio with writer, Adam Melchor, and producer, Giulio Cercato. It was the first time the three of us had worked together and there were great vibes right from the start. I like to live a song before I write about it and that day we were all venting about the music industry and our individual takes and experiences. I was telling them how long I’ve been pursuing music and that there was a period I went through where I was feeling a little bit of doubt. We started with that idea. There’s a phase in your life when you’re in your twenties and maybe just getting out of college. A time when you love what you do but nothing’s happening. It’s a song telling you to keep going and trust your gut. Even if it takes longer than you thought. We wanted it to be fun but not too serious, with a cool 60’s/70’s vibe. It’s a song about my life and I’m so glad it’s out for everyone to hear.

What was the recording process like?

SO: Since we already knew what we wanted to say we needed to find a groove to match. The thing I love about this track is that it steers in the sonic direction of where I’m going. I loved infusing synths and live instruments and diving deeper into a gritty alternative world.

What can you tell me about the video for “The Hard Way?”

SO: I made the video with a great friend of mine, Ryan Espinosa. The video is fun and lighthearted and I even got my band involved. The cool thing is the song, artwork and video were all done with people that are close to me, which makes it even more special.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Savannah Outen by Clicking Here!

‘Mixtape’: Executive Producer Natalie Barandes Discusses Infectious New AXS TV Series

One of the coolest, and most revealing, classic rock series has got to be AXS TV’s new star-studded “Mixtape,” which airs Thursday nights at 8:30pE/5:30pP.

Dubbed the story of a musical artist’s life through the songs that they love each of the eight-episode series shines a light on a different rock icon as they sit down to discuss some of their favorite songs of all time. In doing so, they not only share a personal playlist of music that shaped their lives but also tell stories of how the songs impacted their own musical trajectory. They also reveal things about themselves you may never have heard before.

The debut season includes appearances by such legendary artists as Mick Jones & Kelly Hansen (Foreigner), Kevin Cronin and Dave Amato (REO Speedwagon), Rick Springfield, Don McLean, Robby Krieger (The Doors) and Micky Dolenz (The Monkees). For fans of the classic rock genre this is a series and musical celebration that is not to be missed.

I recently spoke to executive producer and Natalie Barandes (Founder/Creative Chief Joy Factory) about “Mixtape,” her career and much more in this exclusive new interview.

What inspired the new AXS TV series, “Mixtape?” How did it all come about?

Natalie Barandes: I have a friend from high school who I used to trade mix tapes with. She’s always been a collector and one day she brought me over a stack of them. They had so much great music on them. I remember listening to them and seeing the variation of how it went from one song to the next to the next. It was a story of my life. That’s when I thought this could be a great format to profile a musical artist and the songs they grew up with and loved. We could understand them on a whole different level.

What’s the format of the show?

NB: Every episode has the same four-chapter format: Influences, The Rise, then the Deep Dive, which is a defining moment that usually has a nugget you may not know about. It ends with Today and Tomorrow, which is what’s going on with the artist right now and what they’re listening to. 

What were some of the interesting things you discovered while working on the show?

NB: When you look at the artists in the series as a whole you see a lot of similarities in age and musical influences, but then you realize how different their career trajectories became. For example, Mick Jones [Foreigner] talks about Buddy Holly and then so does Don McLean. They both had a lot of love for the same guy but had very different careers. On the classic rock side you can see The Beatles were a huge influence, but there’s also a lot pre-Beatles music that was important to their careers, like Cliff Richard and Gerry and The Pacemakers.

Photo courtesy AXS TV – Joy Factory

What were some of the challenges of putting together the series?

NB: I had to do an extensive amount of research and we were tied to a tight budget, timeline and turnaround. Once we booked the artist I had about ninety minutes to take a journey into their lives and the music that inspired them. It was a challenge but once we were in the room together it was amazing.

Was having a career in entertainment something you always envisioned?

NB: Absolutely. I grew up in New York and my family was in the entertainment business. My father and uncle were both involved in Broadway Theater so I saw everything when I was growing up. In the 80s I had the opportunity to work for MTV and did weekend promos for a few years. That formulated my background. Then when I moved to Los Angeles in the 90s a lot of my early work was doing video profiles for record labels where I did a lot of amazing interviews.

Are there any other projects you’re currently working on?

NB: One of the things we’re working on is taking the concept of “Mixtape” and playlist and expanding it into multiple genres, like “Mixtape Country,” “Mixtape RnB, Hip-hop.” There’s even interest in “Mixtape Gospel and Christian” as well as “Mixtape Comedy,” where comedians tell stories about their lives through the comedy that they love.

What satisfies you the most about “Mixtape” and what would you like viewers to take away from watching?

NB: I remember after we finished filming the episode with Kevin Cronin and Dave Amato from REO Speedwagon, I came out with tears in my eyes and told someone that I have the best job in the world. I got to sit five feet away from a band I loved growing up and talked music. The same goes for Mick Jones and Kelly Hansen from Foreigner, or getting to listen to Don McLean sing “American Pie.” These are songs that were my favorites growing up. “Mixtape” is an absolute gift for anyone who loves music and my hope is the show opens your mind to how much wonderful music there is in the world. Some of which you may never even knew existed.

 “Mixtape” airs Thursday nights at 8:30pE / 5:30pP on AXS TV.

Interview: Emma Taylor Discusses Her Ethereal New Single, ‘For Forever’

Following the release of her infectious single, “My Dear,” and having taking some time off to finish her education, singer-songwriter Emma Taylor is back with a powerful new track. The ubiquitously-charged, “For Forever.”

The single, inspired from stories the songstress heard from friends about unhappy relationships, is both poignant and poetic. Moreover, it’s a track that, when stripped to its barest of essentials, resonates deep with emotion and energy — both a key to Taylor’s signature sound. At its core, “For Forever” is a song that not only yearns for repeated listenings but also showcases the depth of maturity in Taylor’s vocal and artistic prowess.

I recently spoke with Taylor about the new single, her songwriting and much more in this exclusive new interview.

How did the new single, ‘For Forever’ come about?

Emma Taylor: All my songs have an underlying theme of love, loss and relationships. I love telling stories or taking a small emotion and creating an entire song out of it. I’m at the age where my friends have been dating guys or trying to date guys. Some of them are unhappy but will tell me they’re scared of being alone. I took that idea. It’s a song about being in a toxic relationship with someone but not willing to take the risk of being alone because you’re so used to being comfortable. It’s uncomfortable to have change in your life, and it’s something everyone can relate to. Not just with love but in taking risks in their careers. I drew all those emotions and put it into the song.

What else can you tell me about the writing and recording process?

ET: The basis of the song and the skeleton happened so naturally. Originally, “For Forever” was just a placeholder title. I tried to find different words but I just couldn’t get it out of my head. I remember when I first had the chorus and melody and posted the idea on Instagram. It sounds the same now as it did then. You know a song is going to be digestible if it sounds good with just guitar and vocals. If you can break it down and it still has depth you know it’s going to be special. This is such a deep song and I want people to just listen to the words and story.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Emma Taylor by Clicking Here.

Interview: Liv Warfield Discusses Her Emotional New Single, ‘Mantra’

From her days as a member of Prince’s New Power Generation to her acclaimed solo career and time fronting Roadcase Royale, her ubiquitously cool project with Nancy Wilson (Heart), there can be no denying that powerhouse vocalist Liv Warfield is a force of to be reckoned with. As evidenced by her emotionally-charged new single, “Mantra.”

Written by Warfield along with longtime friend and guitarist Ryan Waters, the song is a roller coaster ride of blues and soul, and equally as honest in its surreality.

Backed by Waters’ tasty guitar prowess and a 42-piece orchestra (arranged by Grammy-winning conductor, Mateo Messina), “Mantra” not only showcases the artist’s unique and powerful vocal range but is also an undying message of hope.

The song, which took nearly four years to complete, and had even piqued the interest of Prince himself shortly before his passing, is indicative of an artist who’s found her musical foundation.

I recently spoke with Warfield about “Mantra”, her work with Roadcase Royale, Prince and much more in this exclusive new interview.

How did “Mantra” come about?

Liv Warfield: As an independent artist, we’re always trying to find the next thing. Ryan Waters and I had the song in an infant stage around the same time I had the chance to open-up for Heart. Prince was still alive at the time and when he heard the song he was wowed by it. The song is full of emotional highs and low and the lyrics are what I was feeling. It’s taken four years to complete but I think everyone can relate to the song’s roller coaster ride.

I have to ask you, what was it like working with Prince?

LW: It was incredible and an experience like no other. There’s so many emotions I feel across the board whenever I think of him. He was a teacher, a mentor and a friend. One of the best experiences for me was being able to watch him on stage. Just the energy he put off to everyone. You couldn’t help but just freeze in the moment. It was magic and I miss him every single day.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Liv Warfield by Clicking Here!