Tag: Brooke Josephson

‘Showin’ Up’: Brooke Josephson Discusses Her Infectious New EP

Brooke Josephson

Known for her catchy pop tunes with a tongue-in-cheek take on domestic life, singer-songwriter and actress Brooke Josephson is showin’ up for another round of infectiously honest and hook-laden material. 

Josephson’s new EP, Showin’ Up, is the follow up to her acclaimed and female-empowered Sexy & Domesticated, and features introspective songs discussing the shifting energy and acceptance of who we are, the importance of the creative journey and making a difference, and the profoundness of lost relationship. 

Self-produced by Josephson, Showin’ Up was mixed and mastered by Grammy winning engineer, Brendan Dekora (Paul McCartney, Foo Fighters, Anita Baker) and features musicians like guitarists Chris Nordlinger, Tim Pierce (Goo Goo Dolls, Crowded House, Phil Collins) and drummer Seth Rausch (Keith Urban, Sheryl Crow, Little Big Town). The EP also includes Josephson’s spin on the Bonnie Raitt classic, “Love Me Like A Man,” and features a radio single as well as an extended jam. 

I recently spoke with Josephson about the new EP and more in this exclusive new interview.

How would you describe Showin’ Up in terms of its sound, and maybe how it relates to some of your previous work?

Josephson: I really leaned in with guitars on this one with Chris Nordlinger. When I think about the progression, both artistically and in my life, there’s been a lot of growth. This one definitely has more of a grounded, rock and roll sound.

What was the writing process like?

Josephson: I actually wrote all of the songs before the pandemic and was performing them live for about six months. It started with lyrics and then I put the music down in my home studio, gave it to my band, and the songs grew every time we played them live. Then we had our opening show at The Whisky in January of 2020 and everything came to a halt. I’ve been sitting with these songs for a bit, and they’ve taken on a whole new meaning from when they were first inspired.

Let’s discuss a few of the tracks, starting with “Rainbow.” What can you tell me about it?

Josephson: “Rainbow” was another one of those songs that was inspired by my daughter. I had picked her up from school one day and she seemed really upset. She put a smile on her face, but I could tell she wasn’t ok. It wasn’t until bedtime that she started crying and said that one of her closest friends had told her to find new friends. It was heartbreaking. So I told her the story of my brother who had a similar issue growing up. Then I remembered that Harry Chapin song, “Flowers Are Red,” and about owning your own color and what makes us special and unique. When she went to sleep I went in and started writing. I wrote it from that perspective and originally planned to release it in 2020. But then the George Floyd trial and Black Lives Matter happened. It was a dark time but there’s been a shift of energy, so when the single finally come out people were ready for something cathartic and bright. It’s a mindful awareness of the differences between us and the humanity that bonds us. 

“Showin’ Up.”

Josephson: I was at a songwriting conference and one of the inspirations was for us to think about writing a song to open our shows with. I thought about what makes doing a live show or going to a show so special, and it’s really all in the power of showin’ up. Not just the audience coming to be present but also as an artist. From the time you pick up your instrument for the first time or start wiring. Having to show up for yourself even when no one else is watching. It leads to the moment when everyone can come together. It’s another song that took on new meaning when I watched the heroes of the pandemic and the essential workers showing up to save lives while we were all stuck at home. It went from a performer’s point of view to something much bigger. 

“Don’t Say.”

Josephson: That was inspired after my parents divorced after thirty-five years of marriage. Even though I was an adult, it affected me profoundly. My brother and a few close friends also went through divorces well. It’s a song about change but still wanting to hold on to what was. It was my way of writing a song for them.

What made you decide to do a cover of “Love Me Like A Man?” 

Josephson: I’ve always been a fan of Bonnie Raitt. That song has so much grit and I’ve always performed it live. In my head I started hearing it with a different rhythm, sort of like the Nine Inch Nails song, “Closer.” We were having so much fun with it in the studio that I just let it keep running. That’s why there’s a radio version and an extended version on the EP. It wasn’t ego driven, we were all just in the groove. 

Are there any other projects you’re currently working on right now?

Josephson: In addition to being a mom I’ve been booking things around music and live shows, including acting opportunities that have been popping up. I’ll be in New York in March to film a thriller that centers around the murder of my character. I’ve also been doing the voice of a fairy in a Disney feature that I’ve recently recorded. 

Was there something you learned about yourself during lockdown, or a philosophy you’ve taken away from not being able to do the things you normally would?

Josephson: I’ve really had to recognize my struggle with perfectionism, and I didn’t realize how hard I was on myself. I like being productive but also had to be sensitive with two kids taking school on Zoom and my husband, who was also working from home. I’ve been leaning into self-compassions and, in doing so, I have more compassion for others. That was a big takeaway for me. 

Now that we’re starting to slowly come out of the pandemic what are you most looking forward to about the future?

Josephson: Collaborating. I still remember when I walked on set for the “Rainbow” music video and saw my band for the first time I was laughing and crying. We were all together making music in the same room again. I’d love to work with other artists, whether it’s writing with them or having other songwriters who are looking for an artist to record their song. I’m really looking forward to collaborating and just being with people. 

Interview: Brooke Josephson discusses working with DJ Rocky G on infectious Re-mix of ‘Mr. Fix It’

Following the release of her acclaimed pop-rock EP, Sexy N’ Domesticated, singer-songwriter Brooke Josephson teamed up with international house producer Rocky G for an infectious remix of her single, “Mr. Fix It.” The electro-house version, complete with a progressive beat and dreamy synths, taunts female domestication by encouraging women to find someone who can cater to her needs.

The accompanying music video for “Mr. Fix It” showcases psychedelic visuals of the artist intermingled with scenes of a Rocky G live performance as well as Josephson’s adorable nine-year-old daughter, Shira.

AXS recently spoke with Brooke Josephson about the remix of “Mr. Fix It” and much more in this exclusive new interview.

AXS: How did the idea to do a remake of “Mr. Fix It” come about?

Brooke Josephson: Over the summer I was reading stories about other women who were pursuing being independent artists (and other careers) while at the same time juggling being a full-time mom. I came across Rocky G’s video where she shared her story about being an international DJ and a mom of six. I thought that was amazing. So I reached out to thank her for her work and inspiration as well as to let her know what I had going on. She responded and the two of us started talking about collaborating. I sent her my music and we started dialoguing about the song and bouncing ideas for a video. She told me that she would be performing at an event in Amsterdam, so I flew over and that’s where we shot the video. We even incorporated some of the events into the video as well.

AXS: What was the process like for re-mixing your original song?

BJ: I sent Rocky G all the stems from the original recording. She laid down a beat, took the original vocals and then added filters and a few other effects to give it an electronic vibe. Then she added an original melody at the intro.

AXS: What was it like working with Rocky G?

BJ: It was so much fun. I quickly discovered that she’s the same version of me, only she was doing EDM music. Her normal routine includes doing shows from ten at night until five in the morning. Then she gets home and instead of going to bed, she stays up and gets the kids ready for school. Then she comes back home and naps and does her work until she has to pick them up again. The same juggle I do in L.A. is what she’s doing in Amsterdam. Even though our styles of music are different our lives are very similar and the drive for what we do is very much the same.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Brooke Josephson by Clicking Here!

Interview: Brooke Josephson discusses her upcoming Los Angeles show, songwriting

Since the release of her new album, Sexy N’ Domesticated’, singer/songwriter Brooke Josephson has been on a whirlwind roll. The five-song EP, which has already received acclaim from both press and industry, celebrates female-empowerment and showcases Josephson’s knack for combing introspective storytelling with catchy melodies and a groove-ridden backbeat. Songs like “Mr. Fix It,” “Crazy Called Normal” and “Horrified” are all autobiographical in nature, but also contain a deep level of musical maturity.

The beautiful songstress will soon take her infectious, multi-genre blend of music to the Silverlake Lounge in Los Angeles, CA for a performance on Friday, July 20. In addition to songs from Sexy N’ Domesticated, fans can also expect to hear tracks from her debut EP, Live And Let Live, which was released five years ago this summer.

AXS recently spoke with Brooke Josephson about her upcoming performance at The Silver Lake Lounge, Sexy N’ Domesticated and more in this new interview.

AXS: How has the reaction been to the new EP, Sexy N’ Domesticated?

Brooke Josephson: It’s been great. I’ve gotten a lot of feedback from press and from bloggers. A few of them will be coming out to the show. We had such a great turnout the night of the EP’s release. I remember when the curtains opened, there was a sea of people who were wearing Mr. Fix It hats and Sexy N’ Domesticated bandanas. It was a lot of fun.

AXS: To those who might not be familiar, how would you describe your sound?

BJ: It’s definitely a melting pot of all the genres I’ve been influenced by. My biggest influence being Beck’s Odelayalbum. For this new album, I sampled sounds and gave myself the freedom of not having to choose one specific genre.

AXS: What can fans expect from your upcoming performance at The Silverlake Lounge?

BJ: I’ll be doing a mix of songs from the new EP as well as songs from my first EP, Live And Let Live, along with a few covers. I’ve been doing a version of Bonnie Raitt’s “Love Me Like A Man” and an encore performance of “Zombie” by The Cranberries. The band I have is awesome and it’s a lot of fun performing with them.

AXS: Can you tell me the origin of the track, “Horrified” from the new EP?

BJ: It was inspired when I was doing an auction at my daughter’s preschool, which was something I had never done before. Sometimes when you collaborate with other people creatively feathers can get ruffled, and there was a mother who was pretty fired up about something as simple as the color of tablecloth and napkins I had chosen. She took it upon herself to write a pretty nasty email to the parents and administrators of the school about me and how horrified she was by my decisions. I wasn’t prepared to encounter something like that at this stage of my life, so I took a step back and then took the time to write a song about it.

AXS: Do you usually draw inspiration for your songs from life events?

BJ: Carole King once said that the songs from her Tapestry album were snapshots of moments in her life that she wrote about. I embraced that philosophy for writing. The songs are inspired by things that have actually happened, but I also take some liberties to create characters and use third-person. Some of it is me and some of it is fiction or blended with people I’ve met along the way.

AXS: This year marks the fifth anniversary of your EP, Live and Let Live. How much have you learned and grown as an artist since then?

BJ: When I listen to the first EP and then Sexy N’ Domesticated  I’m usually like, “Wow! Is this the same person?” [laughs]. That’s how much I’ve grown. Not only in the writing but in the producing as well. I did all the demo production on the songs for this EP. Everything from laying down the parts and guitars to learning about plug-ins. Lyrically, I gave myself the freedom to blend genres and be more literal instead of just having a sound that was metaphoric or poetry-driven.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Brooke Josephson by Clicking Here!

Interview: Brooke Josephson premieres new video for ‘Crazy Called Normal’

Brooke Josephson – Photo by Wes and Alex

Today, AXS premieres the video for Brooke Josephson’s “Crazy Called Normal”. It’s the new single from the singer/songwriter’s upcoming EP, Sexy N’ Domesticated. An album that’s a snapshot of the songstress’ personal journey and features an eclectic mix of musical influences and genres.

With an array of visual metaphors, the video for “Crazy Called Normal” is a tongue-in-cheek look at how silly and mundane the world has become, and how things that were once considered patently absurd have suddenly become acceptable.

AXS recently spoke with Brooke Josephson about“Crazy Called Normal” and more in this new interview.

AXS: What inspired the song, “Crazy Called Normal”?

Brooke Josephson: The song came about after I had just experienced “one of those days.” I remember I had just picked up my daughter from school and she was telling me about some drama that happened at recess. Halfway through the conversation, she just stopped talking and said, “How was your day, Mommy?” Just hearing her little voice; it took everything in me not to start crying. I was able to hold it together and told her that everything was fine. I didn’t want to get emotional, and on the drive home I found myself chanting this mantra: “laugh don’t crack” over and over under my breath. That night, after the kids were in bed, I went into the studio and started writing out the events of the day, keeping that mantra in mind. There’s so much we have to do to be productive, and the things we consider crazy have suddenly become normal. That’s how the song came about.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Brooke Josephson By Clicking Here!

Interview: Singer/Songwriter Brooke Josephson Discusses Her New EP, ‘Sexy N’ Domesticated’

Brooke Josephson – Photo by Wes and Alex

Actress/singer/songwriter Brooke Josephson is set to release her infectious new EP, Sexy N’ Domesticated in April. It’s a female-empowered, five-song album that showcases the beautiful songstress’ knack for combing catchy grooves with hook-laden melodies and introspective storytelling.

Fueled by the release of the first single, “Mr. Fix It,” Josephson takes the listener on a journey of brazen independence. Filling her songs with sultry vocals and tongue in cheek takes on topics that include relationships, marriage and motherhood.

Produced by Tony Berg (Edie Brickell, Aimee Mann) and mixed by Grammy-winning engineer Shawn Everett (Alabama Shakes, John Legend), Josephson has tastefully succeeded with Sexy N’ Domesticated. Writing songs that legitimize her own personal and professional experiences while at the same time offering the same validation to women everywhere.

AXS recently spoke with Josephson about her new EP and more in this exclusive interview.

AXS: How would you describe Sexy N’ Domesticated in terms of its sound?

Brooke Josephson: For me, it’s a sonic snapshot of how my life has been going these last few years. It’s a blend of all the different worlds and musical influences that have inspired me. Not just from my experience in musical theater, but also in pop and rock. I took a path very similar to Beck’s Odelay album where I wasn’t going to settle and just pick one lane or genre. I wanted to use whatever style worked for what I had to say.

AXS: What’s your songwriting process like?

BJ: Most of the time, I start off with writing lyrics, like I did with the song, “Crazy Called Normal”. That song came about when I picked up my daughter at school one day. She had asked me how my day went, and it was just one of those days where so much was happening all at once. I was caught up in the moment and was trying to hold it together in front of her, and just started a mantra as I was driving home. Then after everyone was in bed, I went into my studio and started writing lyrics. The next day, I went back and came up with a fast-paced sequence on my OP-1 to be the spine of the song. It’s a story about how crazy life can be.

AXS: Let’s talk about a few more tracks from the EP, beginning with “Mr. Fix It”.

BJ: My brother was over one night and the two of us were talking about things that were going on. As women, we always like to flesh our thoughts out by talking about them. We all have things we need solved, but we’ll find a way to get there. But I remember my brother seemed to have an answer for everything, and then my husband came home and started chiming in. It was an avalanche [laughs]. I like to write in a notebook and started jotting down about Mr. Fix It and about how guys are wired a certain way. The song is really about embracing the differences of the sexes. Celebrating them while at the same time getting my point across and having fun with it. It’s not about dissing guys but more about, “Hey, I like the advice, but right now I don’t need it.”

Read the rest of my
Interview with Brooke Josephson by Clicking Here!