Category: Movies and TV

Interview: Actress Katie Callaway Discusses Her Versatile Career

It’s not often you meet a woman with the trifecta success of musical theater, film and television, but such is the case for Katie Callaway.

The beautiful actress began her journey studying classical ballet before attending Belmont University and graduating with a BFA in Musical Theatre. During her time there, Callaway appeared in no less than six different musical productions, including the first ever collegiate production of “Les Misérables.” She also wrote, directed, and starred in her senior thesis production of a one-act comedic musical parody of “The Hunger Games.”

With a powerful vocal equaled only by her acting prowess and charm, Callaway served as a key participant in several master classes and workshops by such notable Broadway influences as Jason Robert Brown (“The Last Five Years,” “Songs for a New World”), Benj Pasek & Justin Paul (“Edges,” “Dogfight,” and “A Christmas Story”) and Jen Waldman (Artistic Director at the Hangar Theatre and a part of the Original Broadway Cast of “Wicked”).

As a film and television actress, Callaway’s impressive list of credits includes a recurring role on ABC / Lionsgate’s “Nashville,” as well as being featured in films like “The Clapper” and “Prize Fighter.” She’s also branched out into commercial work and music videos as well. Her latest film, “Inheritance,” is slated for release in 2020.

I recently spoke with Katie Callaway about her career and life in this exclusive new interview.

Did you always know that you wanted to have a career in the arts and entertainment?

Katie Callaway: Absolutely. I’ve always loved performing and the theater and stage. I started really young in life studying classical ballet, and didn’t think being an actress could be a viable career until I was in my pre-teens. That’s when I asked my mom and dad to get me an agent and some head shots. I remember they were a little hesitant at first, but it’s always been on my radar and something that I loved to do. Following your passion and dreams isn’t selfish. It’s a responsibility.

What was it that attracted you to theater?

KC: I’m a big fan of stories and being able to have that one on one, call and response connection with an audience when something beautiful or dramatic happens on stage. There’s something magical about live theater and having an intimate relationship with the people you’re performing for.

You’ve done live theater, movies, commercials and television. As an actress, what are some of the similarities and differences?

KC: They’re all different but it’s all the art of performance. The beauty about live theater is the adrenaline rush you get knowing you only have one shot to get it right. Every night is completely different. In film or TV commercials you might do the take a few times, but once it’s locked in you can put it to bed. You can do a live show twenty to thirty times and still find new ways of falling in love with the character.

Are there any projects you’re currently working on?

KC: I recently filmed an episode of “General Hospital” that aired this past July, which was very exciting. I also have a supporting role in a thriller starring Lily Collins and Simon Pegg called “Inheritance” that’s slated to be released in 2020. There are a few other exciting things coming up that I can’t really discuss except to say stay tuned!

What’s the biggest lesson you’ve learned about yourself as an artist so far?

KC: It’s hard to pick just one thing but I find out more about myself as an artist by the characters I portray. The arts are about questioning the status quo, relying on things that have happened in the past, thinking about what lies ahead and then using the art of storytelling to share it.

What excites you the most about this next phase of your career?

KC: One thing I’m looking forward to is the opportunity to travel for different roles. It’s nice that the hub doesn’t always have to be L.A. anymore. I’m excited to get more stamps on my passport and seeing different parts of the world.

What’s the best bit of advice you can give to someone who may just be starting out?

KC: Keep your foot on the gas. If it’s something you feel called to do then don’t let anyone tell you that you can’t. It’s a viable career for anyone as long as you’re willing to put in the hard work. There’s a lot to be said for talent and networking but at the end of the day it’s all about perseverance. Always work to better your skillset and self as a human being. We need to follow the things we’re called to do.

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‘Mixtape’: Executive Producer Natalie Barandes Discusses Infectious New AXS TV Series

One of the coolest, and most revealing, classic rock series has got to be AXS TV’s new star-studded “Mixtape,” which airs Thursday nights at 8:30pE/5:30pP.

Dubbed the story of a musical artist’s life through the songs that they love each of the eight-episode series shines a light on a different rock icon as they sit down to discuss some of their favorite songs of all time. In doing so, they not only share a personal playlist of music that shaped their lives but also tell stories of how the songs impacted their own musical trajectory. They also reveal things about themselves you may never have heard before.

The debut season includes appearances by such legendary artists as Mick Jones & Kelly Hansen (Foreigner), Kevin Cronin and Dave Amato (REO Speedwagon), Rick Springfield, Don McLean, Robby Krieger (The Doors) and Micky Dolenz (The Monkees). For fans of the classic rock genre this is a series and musical celebration that is not to be missed.

I recently spoke to executive producer and Natalie Barandes (Founder/Creative Chief Joy Factory) about “Mixtape,” her career and much more in this exclusive new interview.

What inspired the new AXS TV series, “Mixtape?” How did it all come about?

Natalie Barandes: I have a friend from high school who I used to trade mix tapes with. She’s always been a collector and one day she brought me over a stack of them. They had so much great music on them. I remember listening to them and seeing the variation of how it went from one song to the next to the next. It was a story of my life. That’s when I thought this could be a great format to profile a musical artist and the songs they grew up with and loved. We could understand them on a whole different level.

What’s the format of the show?

NB: Every episode has the same four-chapter format: Influences, The Rise, then the Deep Dive, which is a defining moment that usually has a nugget you may not know about. It ends with Today and Tomorrow, which is what’s going on with the artist right now and what they’re listening to. 

What were some of the interesting things you discovered while working on the show?

NB: When you look at the artists in the series as a whole you see a lot of similarities in age and musical influences, but then you realize how different their career trajectories became. For example, Mick Jones [Foreigner] talks about Buddy Holly and then so does Don McLean. They both had a lot of love for the same guy but had very different careers. On the classic rock side you can see The Beatles were a huge influence, but there’s also a lot pre-Beatles music that was important to their careers, like Cliff Richard and Gerry and The Pacemakers.

Photo courtesy AXS TV – Joy Factory

What were some of the challenges of putting together the series?

NB: I had to do an extensive amount of research and we were tied to a tight budget, timeline and turnaround. Once we booked the artist I had about ninety minutes to take a journey into their lives and the music that inspired them. It was a challenge but once we were in the room together it was amazing.

Was having a career in entertainment something you always envisioned?

NB: Absolutely. I grew up in New York and my family was in the entertainment business. My father and uncle were both involved in Broadway Theater so I saw everything when I was growing up. In the 80s I had the opportunity to work for MTV and did weekend promos for a few years. That formulated my background. Then when I moved to Los Angeles in the 90s a lot of my early work was doing video profiles for record labels where I did a lot of amazing interviews.

Are there any other projects you’re currently working on?

NB: One of the things we’re working on is taking the concept of “Mixtape” and playlist and expanding it into multiple genres, like “Mixtape Country,” “Mixtape RnB, Hip-hop.” There’s even interest in “Mixtape Gospel and Christian” as well as “Mixtape Comedy,” where comedians tell stories about their lives through the comedy that they love.

What satisfies you the most about “Mixtape” and what would you like viewers to take away from watching?

NB: I remember after we finished filming the episode with Kevin Cronin and Dave Amato from REO Speedwagon, I came out with tears in my eyes and told someone that I have the best job in the world. I got to sit five feet away from a band I loved growing up and talked music. The same goes for Mick Jones and Kelly Hansen from Foreigner, or getting to listen to Don McLean sing “American Pie.” These are songs that were my favorites growing up. “Mixtape” is an absolute gift for anyone who loves music and my hope is the show opens your mind to how much wonderful music there is in the world. Some of which you may never even knew existed.

 “Mixtape” airs Thursday nights at 8:30pE / 5:30pP on AXS TV.

Interview: Eddie Trunk Discusses The New Season of AXS-TV’s ‘TrunkFest’

Photo: Stewart Volland/AXS TV

AXS TV’s original series, “TrunkFest” returns for a second season beginning Sunday, July 7 at 9:30 p.m. ET / 6:30 p.m. PT. The show airs as part of AXS TV’s Sunday Night Rocks lineup, which includes the talk and rock series “Rock & Roll Road Trip With Sammy Hagar, and the hilarious and heartfelt reality series “Real Money” starring Eddie Money and his family.

The new season kicks off with Trunk visiting Sammy Hagar’s High Tide Beach Party and Car Show, where Trunk takes in all the sights and sounds at one of summer’s ultimate beach bashes. He’ll also spend time with a slate of musical heavyweights, including The Red Rocker himself, along with Eddie Money, Vince Neil and Kevin Cronin (REO Speedwagon).

Future episodes of “TrunkFest” include Trunk experiencing Vail Snow Days with Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats; hanging out with Judah and the Lion and lovelytheband at Gulf Shores’ Hangout Music Festival, and visiting Country Jam for a weekend of tricked-out trailers and interviews with Jon Pardi and Craig Campbell.

What makes the new season even more exciting is the addition of several special events which include the Monsters of Rock Cruise (featuring Tesla and Extreme), the NAMM festival—with guitarists Dave Amato (REO Speedwagon) and Vivian Campbell (Def Leppard), a visit to a Rock & Roll Fantasy Camp, and a celebration of the 50thanniversary of Woodstock.

With such wide variety of festivals and events to choose from the stage is set nicely for the second season to connect with its existing audience and give even more people the chance to discover it for the first time. Unlike his radio show and work on his previous series like “That Metal Show,” “TrunkFest” takes host Eddie Trunk out of his comfort zone, which is what really excites him the most.

I recently spoke with Eddie Trunk about the new season of “TrunkFest” music and more in this exclusive new interview.

Photo Courtesy: AXS TV

What can fans expect from the new season of “TrunkFest” on AXS TV?

It picks up where first season left off. It’s the same format of me going to various music festivals and events. The difference this season is the diversity. We’re getting a little wider in what we cover. There’s one episode in Las Vegas at a Rock & Roll Fantasy Camp. Then there’s another where I’m at NAMM, which is the biggest gathering of music merchandisers in the country. Then there’s one from The Monsters of Rock Cruise. So in addition to the regular traditional festivals, this season also features a wider variety with a trade show, cruise and a rock camp.

What were some of the things you did this season that took you out of your comfort zone?

Skiing in Vail, Colorado was pretty cool. I’d only ever skied once and to get out in one of the most beautiful locations in the world and get a lesson was a lot of fun. I also went to Gulf Shores, Alabama and a festival called Hangout. It’s not something I’d normally go to as a fan but it exposed me to a completely different world. That’s what the show is really about. Me going into the festival and having that first time experience right along with the audience.

How much work goes into filming an episode?

Traditionally, most festivals happen over the course of a weekend. My shooting is normally a day or day and a half and then the crew spends an extra day shooting footage of different things going on that can be cut into the show. I have to give a big shout out to the crew because they put a lot of work into it. You have to deal with the elements at a lot of the places we go. I’m only there for a short time but they’re carrying around heavy gear and sound equipment for days. It can be grueling and not always in the most comfortable conditions. People who watch the show know it’s not glamorous. Since there’s no make-up or wardrobe, I can look rough, hammered and sweaty at times [laughs]. But that’s me. I don’t try to fake it. I’m out enjoying the festival and bringing the experience to the people as best I can.

Photo Courtesy: AXS TV

Were there any cool revelations you learned in doing the interviews this season?

A lot of what I do during the interview segments is talk to the artists about the day and what’s going on. One of the cool things this season was an episode we did on the 50thanniversary of Woodstock. One of the most well-known guys from that day was John Sebastian, who told me a great story about how he had no intention of even going. He just stumbled upon it and got roped in to help out and it became one of the event’s most legendary performances. That was really revealing.  

You’ve interviewed some of the all-time greats in the world of hard rock and heavy metal. Is there one person you haven’t interviewed that you’d like to?

After so many years in the industry I’ve checked off a lot of boxes as far as that’s concerned. Jimmy Page would certainly be one along with Howard Stern (who’s not really music}. I interviewed Eddie Van-Halen briefly over the phone once but I’d also love to do an in depth interview with him.

Speaking of Van-Halen, there’s been a lot of rumors circulating again about a reunion. Do you think one will ever happen?

It’s funny you mention that because Michael [Anthony] was on my radio show recently and told me he wasn’t doing anything at this time because they [Van-Halen] were supposed to be rehearsing for shows this year. The plan to go out was real but it was aborted. Michael’s technically not in the band and doesn’t know why. It just kind of went away. I think they just have a hard time getting everything in line and deciding what they want to do with who and how. They’re very quiet and no one really talks. It’s a band I’m asked about daily and the reality is no one really knows but them.

Photo Courtesy: AXS TV

You’re a big Dio fan so I wanted to get your thoughts on the Dio Returns show with the hologram. Have you had a chance to see it?

I haven’t had a chance due to scheduling but many of the people who go say that they enjoyed it. Others aren’t so sure. Something that people may not realize is that the guy produced the show, Jeff Pezzuti, is a huge Dio fan. People think this is being done just to make a cash grab but that’s not the case at all. Jeff built his business around his love of Dio and trying to keep his music and legacy alive. I think that’s important for fans to understand.

Are there any other projects you’re currently working on?

My daily radio show has been my main thing. It’s like sports talk for rock fans on Sirius/XM Channel 106. We do a live show from 2-4 with a replay every night, 9-11 E.T. I also do a monthly show from The Rainbow in L.A. and it’s been a blast to do. Outside of that, I’m doing a bunch of hosting and speaking engagements. I also recently found out that my publisher wants me to do a revised edition of my first book, “Essential Hard Rock and Heavy Metal”, with updated sections on the bands along with a new forward. Every day is a different adventure.

What excites you the most about the new season of “TrunkFest”?

The thing I’m looking forward to the most is watching the show grow and connect with new people. In season one we only had eight episodes. Now, we’ll have about eighteen in total and my hope is that more people will get to see it and talk about it. We have more music festivals in this country now than we’ve ever had, including a lot that most people don’t even know about. This show is the eyes and ears to these festivals and what goes on. We still pay attention to the genre of music and who’s playing, but it’s also about seeing what goes on in the ultra-VIP areas, backstage, on stage and in the audience. It’s a travel and experience show. People who loved season one will love the new season and we’re looking forward to getting some new people on board as well. 

Season Two of AXS TV’s original series, “TrunkFest” premieres Sunday, July 7 at 9:30pE/6:30pP on AXS.

Interview: Gabrielle Stone Discusses Her Inspiring New Book, ‘Eat, Pray, #FML’

Although Gabrielle Stone has never considered herself an author, the accomplished actress and director has always been an avid storyteller. But it wasn’t until a series of failed relationships — one which included a nightmarish divorce and another that ended with her traveling to Europe alone — that she decided to put pen to paper. The story of the events of her trip, the inspiration and thought processes are chronicled in her amazing new book, “Eat, Pray, #FML

Told from the perspective of a woman seeking to find inner strength and resolve, Stone has documented a journey unlike anything she’s ever experienced. One that was not only personally cathartic for the author, but a story that’s sure to give others the inspiration they need to perservere.

In its truest form, “Eat, Pray, #FML” is an inside, pull-no-punches look at Stone’s personal diary, but it’s also a book that reads like a mystery novel and flows like a female-empowered Lifetime drama. Pulling you in from the start with its honest writing and heartfelt emotion. Better still, it leaves readers with the tools they can use to overcome any personal obstacle.

“Eat, Pray, #FML” is available in paperback and e-book exclusively through Amazon. Click here to order!

I recently spoke with Gabrielle Stone about “Eat, Pray, #FML” and more in this exclusive new interview.

What was the writing process like?

Everything was written in real time as it was happening. It just happened to be a crazy trip where some interesting things took place. This book will connect with any female who’s ever been in love, felt betrayed, or isn’t sure how to live with herself. I don’t embellish anything that happened on the trip and I wrote the book as if you were having a conversation with me. Yes, I slept with some people; I drank, and I smoked in Amsterdam. But I tell these things so that when I get to the golden nuggets of what I learned and how I found ways to heal, it will resonate that much more.

A lot of what happened in your relationship with your ex-husband and your discovery of his infidelity almost doesn’t seem real. Did you notice any warning signs?

I want everyone to know that I have no hate, resentment or anger toward my ex-husband. Having said that, I’m so happy to be out of that situation and being where I am now. The warning signs were there, but I always turned a blind eye and thought that we’d eventually fix things down the road. The truth is, he’d never been ok with my career, and whenever I’d go off to shoot a film with a kissing scene, or just be with male co-stars, there was a lot of jealousy. I went through a lot of hurt during that time because I was getting roles that were exciting professionally but then had to combat it with the berating and heartache from someone who was supposed to be one of my biggest supporters. It wasn’t as if I was working some other job and then decided to be in movies. He met me as a working actress. This is who I’ve always been. From an outside perspective, it’s hard to believe how he could’ve been so sloppy, but once I started finding things it all unfolded like it would in a movie.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Gabrielle Stone by Clicking Here!

 

 

 

‘Powwow Highway’: Actress Amanda Wyss Discusses Films 30th Anniversary And Continued Relevancy

Still powerful in its message and poignant in its relevancy more than thirty years after its release “Powwow Highway,” based on the novel by David Seals, remains one of the most timeless and significant films about the indigenous struggle to preserve their native culture.

The film tells the story of Native American Philbert Bono (Gary Farmer), a reflective and loveable man seeking to gain higher identity through the use of mystical and traditional means. His friend and Vietnam War veteran, Buddy Red Bow (A Martinez), is an adversarial social activist trying desperately to protect what’s left of his Cheyenne Reservation from government interlopers and greedy land developers.

The story takes a unique turn when the duo goes on an unexpected road trip in a rusted-out car to rescue Red Bow’s sister, Bonnie (Joanelle Romero), who’s been wrongly accused and arrested in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Along their journey, Red Bow’s hard-edged view of life and the world around him is put to the test by Philbert’s resolve and undying faith. Together they will learn the true meaning of their heritage, friendship and love.

The award-winning film, which includes the coveted Filmmakers Trophy at the 1989 Sundance Film Festival, was produced by late Beatle George Harrison and features a rich soundtrack that includes songs by Robbie Robertson, U2 and Creedence Clearwater Revival.

Amanda Wyss, who’s intense portrayal of the flawed Meridith Lane in the 2015 psychological thriller, “The Id,” is equally as brilliant in “Powwow Highway” as Rabbit Layton, a fiery Texan who plays an important role in the film’s climatic third act.

Although filmed in the late 1980s, the messages behind “Powwow Highway” tragically continues to stand the test of time.

I recently spoke with Wyss about the 30th anniversary of “Powwow Highway” and more in this exclusive new interview.

When you look back on “Powwow Highway” with so much perspective what thoughts come to mind?

It doesn’t feel like thirty years have gone by because I remember it as if it were yesterday. It was exciting on so many levels. First, it was based on real characters and we had an amazing cast of brilliant actors like Gary Farmer, A Martinez and Joanelle Romero. George Harrison produced it and Robbie Robertson was doing the music. We filmed it as a road movie in Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota and New Mexico and everyone became immersed in the story.

Why do you think the film remains timeless and relevant so many years later?

It’s amazing and tragic at how so little has changed. That’s why it remains so relevant. From working on the film, I learned a lot about the activism side and how hard different reservations have to fight against the government just to maintain their land, culture and resources. I walked away from the film with a deeper respect for the people fighting to protect and preserve what they have left. It’s made a lifelong impact on me. But we all share a similar deep connection. Jonathan Wacks [director] went on to teach film at the College of Santa Fe for many years. Joanelle also goes there a lot. She created The Red Nation Film Festival, which showcases indigenous filmmakers. She’s a great actress, singer-songwriter and mother.

What initially attracted you to the story?

I was sent the script and knew right away it was a part I had to play. I loved Philbert Bono (Gary Farmer) and the character of Buddy Red Bow (A Martinez) and their relationship. I also loved that it was set in the southwest and based on real people. The character of Rabbit Layton was so fun. I felt her in my bones.

Do you have a funny story to share about the role?

I remember going to read for the role and it was put on tape. I had a hair appointment later that afternoon and dyed my hair red and the color didn’t come out right. I was resigned to having to wear it for a while but then got a call back and had that put-on tape as well. Up to this point, I hadn’t even met the director and got a call from him later that night offering me the role. I’ll never forget what he said: “You know, it might have just been the lighting, but on camera your hair looks pink” [laughs]. I admitted to him that it was and he asked if there was any way I could put it back to blonde. Give credit to the wonderful hairdresser because I had about five days to change it back.

Amanda Wyss – Gary Farmer

What were your thoughts when the film won the Filmmakers Trophy at Sundance?

It was thrilling. We didn’t celebrate it there but we knew it was special because its message and story was so powerful. I feel lucky to have played a part in telling it.

Do you ever foresee yourself getting on the other side of the camera at some point?

I have a strong desire to direct and hope that will be my next phase. I love the idea of not just having a microcosm of a movie as an actor but an overall view of the story and all of the little pieces. To be able to put people together on the same page as you are about the story you want to tell and how you want to tell it. I’d be very excited to do that.

What role would you consider to be your deepest dive as an actress?

One of my deepest dives was “The Id.” It was an extraordinary experience with people who protected and enabled me to go down a rabbit hole that was deep and messy. I felt totally safe because of the director of photography, the director and producer. It was a huge learning experience for me and a powerful, creative moment. I like playing characters with a dark side that gets revealed and feel very fortunate for the people who’ve given me the opportunities and roles I’ve been able to play.

Interview: Josh Malerman discusses The High Strung’s New Album, ‘Quiet Riots’ and writing ‘Bird Box’

Photo by Doug Coombe

Josh Malerman and the rest of adventure rockers The High Strung have unveiled the band’s eighth full-length release, Quiet Riots. The fourteen-track album is the group’s most harmony-laden to date, as it sees them reuniting with guitarist/vocalist Mark Owen, who’d been on hiatus for more than twelve years. Songs like the guitar-driven “Legion” and the effervescent “If You Wanna Roll” conjure up images of free-spirit and cross country drives, while tracks like “Riots Of The Mind” are a reminder that this world is still a very unsettled place.

The High Strung is: Josh Malerman (guitar/vocals), Mark Owen (guitar/vocals), Stephen Palmer (guitar), Chad Stocker (bass) and Derek Berk (drums).

Josh Malerman’s artistry not only lies within the craft of music but also as an acclaimed novelist. His post-apocalyptic thriller, “Bird Box,” a New York Times Bestseller, was recently adapted into a Netflix original feature. Since its release last December the film, which stars Sandra Bullock and John Malkovich, has become Netflix’s biggest hit to date.

AXS recently spoke with Malerman about The High Strung’s new album, Quiet Riots, “Bird Box” and more in this exclusive new interview.

AXS: How does the new album, Quiet Riots, relate to some of the band’s previous work?

Josh Malerman: This is the most harmony-laden album so far and a lot of it has to do with Stephen, our lead guitarist, who was more involved in this singing. Then there’s Mark Owen, one of our two singer-songwriters, who had left the band for twelve years and returned. For me, this will always be the album that was kickstarted by Mark’s return and our first real attempt at a harmony album.

AXS: What’s your songwriting process like?

JM: Usually either Mark or I will come in with a little hook of an idea. Whether it’s a chord change or a lyric one of us will bring it to the table and we’ll finish the song together. [Mark] Owen is also great at lyrics, and when you have a songwriting partner who cares so much about them as he does you can’t help but step up your game.

JM: Let’s talk about a few tracks from the new album beginning with “Riots Of The Mind.” What can you tell me about it?

JM: Mark brought that one to the table. It’s a wonderful way of saying things are crazy without being too hazy or political. There’s something pocket poetic about it. There’s a lot of crazy sh#t going on in the world right now and it would be wrong to not even wink in that direction.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Josh Malerman by Clicking Here!

Interview: Theresa Caputo discusses ‘Live! The Experience’ event coming to Bethlehem, PA

Photo: Alex Chaput

Theresa Caputo’s “Live! The Experience” is a one-of-a-kind event that connects the Long Island Medium with legions of loyal fans and skeptics from across the country. Each show is uniquely different in that it brings people from all walks of life together for an evening that’s spontaneously spiritual and, at times, beyond belief.

The New York Times Best-Selling Author and star of her acclaimed series, “Long Island Medium,”is about embarking on a whole new round of dates that will take her across the U.S. to deliver messages of hope while challenging cynics to believe that anything is possible. One of those stops will be a two-night stay at The Sands Event Center in Bethlehem, PA on Friday and Saturday, Feb. 1 and 2.

Caputo’s been sensing Spirit since she was a small child, but it wasn’t until she was in her twenties that she began to hone her intuitive, sixth-sense ability to put pieces of the puzzle together and help others to heal. Her “Live! The Experience” is certain to be an unforgettable evening.

AXS recently spoke with Theresa Caputo about her Live! The Experience event and more in this exclusive new interview.

AXS: What can fans expect from your upcoming “LIve! The Experience” events at The Sands Event Center in Bethlehem, PA?

Theresa Caputo: With the live show, I always tell people it’s just like watching “Long Island Medium,” but without the shopping [laughs]. I’m so proud of what we’ve been able to create and bring to the live show. Whether there are five people in the room or five-thousand, it’s all spontaneous. I start off the night like any other reading by coming out and giving a quick speech about what people can expect over the next two hours. Then Spirit starts communicating. I’ll leave the stage and whether it’s in the front row, back, or balcony, I’ll stop and deliver the message right in front of the person. We have big screens set up and cameras that follow me around so everyone feels a part of it. No matter where you’re seated you’ll be able to see the messages being delivered up close and personal. Every message provides so much healing. Spirit allows us to continue to go on with life no matter what we’ve been through. It lets us know that there’s more to life than just here in the physical world.

AXS: What do you think attracts people to your live events?

TC: One of the main things is that when a tragedy happens or when we lose someone we sometimes don’t understand why and lose our faith. This show restores that faith and gives hope. Another thing I’ve learned is that people come to the show because they’re skeptical or intrigued. But it doesn’t matter if people believe in what I do or not. I want them to believe in themselves and have their own connection. I want you to believe that all of the things you are feeling are real.

AXS: Was there ever a “wow” moment for you during these live events?

TC: It may sound cliché but with every reading, there are those moments. There are always things that happen where you’ll say, “There’s no way. How could this happen?” But what I do is so much more than just communicate with someone who has died. It reunites families and gives people a sense of peace they can’t get through anything else.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Theresa Caputo by Clicking Here!