Category: Movies and TV

Interview: Eddie Trunk Discusses The New Season of AXS-TV’s ‘TrunkFest’

Photo: Stewart Volland/AXS TV

AXS TV’s original series, “TrunkFest” returns for a second season beginning Sunday, July 7 at 9:30 p.m. ET / 6:30 p.m. PT. The show airs as part of AXS TV’s Sunday Night Rocks lineup, which includes the talk and rock series “Rock & Roll Road Trip With Sammy Hagar, and the hilarious and heartfelt reality series “Real Money” starring Eddie Money and his family.

The new season kicks off with Trunk visiting Sammy Hagar’s High Tide Beach Party and Car Show, where Trunk takes in all the sights and sounds at one of summer’s ultimate beach bashes. He’ll also spend time with a slate of musical heavyweights, including The Red Rocker himself, along with Eddie Money, Vince Neil and Kevin Cronin (REO Speedwagon).

Future episodes of “TrunkFest” include Trunk experiencing Vail Snow Days with Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats; hanging out with Judah and the Lion and lovelytheband at Gulf Shores’ Hangout Music Festival, and visiting Country Jam for a weekend of tricked-out trailers and interviews with Jon Pardi and Craig Campbell.

What makes the new season even more exciting is the addition of several special events which include the Monsters of Rock Cruise (featuring Tesla and Extreme), the NAMM festival—with guitarists Dave Amato (REO Speedwagon) and Vivian Campbell (Def Leppard), a visit to a Rock & Roll Fantasy Camp, and a celebration of the 50thanniversary of Woodstock.

With such wide variety of festivals and events to choose from the stage is set nicely for the second season to connect with its existing audience and give even more people the chance to discover it for the first time. Unlike his radio show and work on his previous series like “That Metal Show,” “TrunkFest” takes host Eddie Trunk out of his comfort zone, which is what really excites him the most.

I recently spoke with Eddie Trunk about the new season of “TrunkFest” music and more in this exclusive new interview.

Photo Courtesy: AXS TV

What can fans expect from the new season of “TrunkFest” on AXS TV?

It picks up where first season left off. It’s the same format of me going to various music festivals and events. The difference this season is the diversity. We’re getting a little wider in what we cover. There’s one episode in Las Vegas at a Rock & Roll Fantasy Camp. Then there’s another where I’m at NAMM, which is the biggest gathering of music merchandisers in the country. Then there’s one from The Monsters of Rock Cruise. So in addition to the regular traditional festivals, this season also features a wider variety with a trade show, cruise and a rock camp.

What were some of the things you did this season that took you out of your comfort zone?

Skiing in Vail, Colorado was pretty cool. I’d only ever skied once and to get out in one of the most beautiful locations in the world and get a lesson was a lot of fun. I also went to Gulf Shores, Alabama and a festival called Hangout. It’s not something I’d normally go to as a fan but it exposed me to a completely different world. That’s what the show is really about. Me going into the festival and having that first time experience right along with the audience.

How much work goes into filming an episode?

Traditionally, most festivals happen over the course of a weekend. My shooting is normally a day or day and a half and then the crew spends an extra day shooting footage of different things going on that can be cut into the show. I have to give a big shout out to the crew because they put a lot of work into it. You have to deal with the elements at a lot of the places we go. I’m only there for a short time but they’re carrying around heavy gear and sound equipment for days. It can be grueling and not always in the most comfortable conditions. People who watch the show know it’s not glamorous. Since there’s no make-up or wardrobe, I can look rough, hammered and sweaty at times [laughs]. But that’s me. I don’t try to fake it. I’m out enjoying the festival and bringing the experience to the people as best I can.

Photo Courtesy: AXS TV

Were there any cool revelations you learned in doing the interviews this season?

A lot of what I do during the interview segments is talk to the artists about the day and what’s going on. One of the cool things this season was an episode we did on the 50thanniversary of Woodstock. One of the most well-known guys from that day was John Sebastian, who told me a great story about how he had no intention of even going. He just stumbled upon it and got roped in to help out and it became one of the event’s most legendary performances. That was really revealing.  

You’ve interviewed some of the all-time greats in the world of hard rock and heavy metal. Is there one person you haven’t interviewed that you’d like to?

After so many years in the industry I’ve checked off a lot of boxes as far as that’s concerned. Jimmy Page would certainly be one along with Howard Stern (who’s not really music}. I interviewed Eddie Van-Halen briefly over the phone once but I’d also love to do an in depth interview with him.

Speaking of Van-Halen, there’s been a lot of rumors circulating again about a reunion. Do you think one will ever happen?

It’s funny you mention that because Michael [Anthony] was on my radio show recently and told me he wasn’t doing anything at this time because they [Van-Halen] were supposed to be rehearsing for shows this year. The plan to go out was real but it was aborted. Michael’s technically not in the band and doesn’t know why. It just kind of went away. I think they just have a hard time getting everything in line and deciding what they want to do with who and how. They’re very quiet and no one really talks. It’s a band I’m asked about daily and the reality is no one really knows but them.

Photo Courtesy: AXS TV

You’re a big Dio fan so I wanted to get your thoughts on the Dio Returns show with the hologram. Have you had a chance to see it?

I haven’t had a chance due to scheduling but many of the people who go say that they enjoyed it. Others aren’t so sure. Something that people may not realize is that the guy produced the show, Jeff Pezzuti, is a huge Dio fan. People think this is being done just to make a cash grab but that’s not the case at all. Jeff built his business around his love of Dio and trying to keep his music and legacy alive. I think that’s important for fans to understand.

Are there any other projects you’re currently working on?

My daily radio show has been my main thing. It’s like sports talk for rock fans on Sirius/XM Channel 106. We do a live show from 2-4 with a replay every night, 9-11 E.T. I also do a monthly show from The Rainbow in L.A. and it’s been a blast to do. Outside of that, I’m doing a bunch of hosting and speaking engagements. I also recently found out that my publisher wants me to do a revised edition of my first book, “Essential Hard Rock and Heavy Metal”, with updated sections on the bands along with a new forward. Every day is a different adventure.

What excites you the most about the new season of “TrunkFest”?

The thing I’m looking forward to the most is watching the show grow and connect with new people. In season one we only had eight episodes. Now, we’ll have about eighteen in total and my hope is that more people will get to see it and talk about it. We have more music festivals in this country now than we’ve ever had, including a lot that most people don’t even know about. This show is the eyes and ears to these festivals and what goes on. We still pay attention to the genre of music and who’s playing, but it’s also about seeing what goes on in the ultra-VIP areas, backstage, on stage and in the audience. It’s a travel and experience show. People who loved season one will love the new season and we’re looking forward to getting some new people on board as well. 

Season Two of AXS TV’s original series, “TrunkFest” premieres Sunday, July 7 at 9:30pE/6:30pP on AXS.

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Interview: Gabrielle Stone Discusses Her Inspiring New Book, ‘Eat, Pray, #FML’

Although Gabrielle Stone has never considered herself an author, the accomplished actress and director has always been an avid storyteller. But it wasn’t until a series of failed relationships — one which included a nightmarish divorce and another that ended with her traveling to Europe alone — that she decided to put pen to paper. The story of the events of her trip, the inspiration and thought processes are chronicled in her amazing new book, “Eat, Pray, #FML

Told from the perspective of a woman seeking to find inner strength and resolve, Stone has documented a journey unlike anything she’s ever experienced. One that was not only personally cathartic for the author, but a story that’s sure to give others the inspiration they need to perservere.

In its truest form, “Eat, Pray, #FML” is an inside, pull-no-punches look at Stone’s personal diary, but it’s also a book that reads like a mystery novel and flows like a female-empowered Lifetime drama. Pulling you in from the start with its honest writing and heartfelt emotion. Better still, it leaves readers with the tools they can use to overcome any personal obstacle.

“Eat, Pray, #FML” is available in paperback and e-book exclusively through Amazon. Click here to order!

I recently spoke with Gabrielle Stone about “Eat, Pray, #FML” and more in this exclusive new interview.

What was the writing process like?

Everything was written in real time as it was happening. It just happened to be a crazy trip where some interesting things took place. This book will connect with any female who’s ever been in love, felt betrayed, or isn’t sure how to live with herself. I don’t embellish anything that happened on the trip and I wrote the book as if you were having a conversation with me. Yes, I slept with some people; I drank, and I smoked in Amsterdam. But I tell these things so that when I get to the golden nuggets of what I learned and how I found ways to heal, it will resonate that much more.

A lot of what happened in your relationship with your ex-husband and your discovery of his infidelity almost doesn’t seem real. Did you notice any warning signs?

I want everyone to know that I have no hate, resentment or anger toward my ex-husband. Having said that, I’m so happy to be out of that situation and being where I am now. The warning signs were there, but I always turned a blind eye and thought that we’d eventually fix things down the road. The truth is, he’d never been ok with my career, and whenever I’d go off to shoot a film with a kissing scene, or just be with male co-stars, there was a lot of jealousy. I went through a lot of hurt during that time because I was getting roles that were exciting professionally but then had to combat it with the berating and heartache from someone who was supposed to be one of my biggest supporters. It wasn’t as if I was working some other job and then decided to be in movies. He met me as a working actress. This is who I’ve always been. From an outside perspective, it’s hard to believe how he could’ve been so sloppy, but once I started finding things it all unfolded like it would in a movie.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Gabrielle Stone by Clicking Here!

 

 

 

‘Powwow Highway’: Actress Amanda Wyss Discusses Films 30th Anniversary And Continued Relevancy

Still powerful in its message and poignant in its relevancy more than thirty years after its release “Powwow Highway,” based on the novel by David Seals, remains one of the most timeless and significant films about the indigenous struggle to preserve their native culture.

The film tells the story of Native American Philbert Bono (Gary Farmer), a reflective and loveable man seeking to gain higher identity through the use of mystical and traditional means. His friend and Vietnam War veteran, Buddy Red Bow (A Martinez), is an adversarial social activist trying desperately to protect what’s left of his Cheyenne Reservation from government interlopers and greedy land developers.

The story takes a unique turn when the duo goes on an unexpected road trip in a rusted-out car to rescue Red Bow’s sister, Bonnie (Joanelle Romero), who’s been wrongly accused and arrested in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Along their journey, Red Bow’s hard-edged view of life and the world around him is put to the test by Philbert’s resolve and undying faith. Together they will learn the true meaning of their heritage, friendship and love.

The award-winning film, which includes the coveted Filmmakers Trophy at the 1989 Sundance Film Festival, was produced by late Beatle George Harrison and features a rich soundtrack that includes songs by Robbie Robertson, U2 and Creedence Clearwater Revival.

Amanda Wyss, who’s intense portrayal of the flawed Meridith Lane in the 2015 psychological thriller, “The Id,” is equally as brilliant in “Powwow Highway” as Rabbit Layton, a fiery Texan who plays an important role in the film’s climatic third act.

Although filmed in the late 1980s, the messages behind “Powwow Highway” tragically continues to stand the test of time.

I recently spoke with Wyss about the 30th anniversary of “Powwow Highway” and more in this exclusive new interview.

When you look back on “Powwow Highway” with so much perspective what thoughts come to mind?

It doesn’t feel like thirty years have gone by because I remember it as if it were yesterday. It was exciting on so many levels. First, it was based on real characters and we had an amazing cast of brilliant actors like Gary Farmer, A Martinez and Joanelle Romero. George Harrison produced it and Robbie Robertson was doing the music. We filmed it as a road movie in Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota and New Mexico and everyone became immersed in the story.

Why do you think the film remains timeless and relevant so many years later?

It’s amazing and tragic at how so little has changed. That’s why it remains so relevant. From working on the film, I learned a lot about the activism side and how hard different reservations have to fight against the government just to maintain their land, culture and resources. I walked away from the film with a deeper respect for the people fighting to protect and preserve what they have left. It’s made a lifelong impact on me. But we all share a similar deep connection. Jonathan Wacks [director] went on to teach film at the College of Santa Fe for many years. Joanelle also goes there a lot. She created The Red Nation Film Festival, which showcases indigenous filmmakers. She’s a great actress, singer-songwriter and mother.

What initially attracted you to the story?

I was sent the script and knew right away it was a part I had to play. I loved Philbert Bono (Gary Farmer) and the character of Buddy Red Bow (A Martinez) and their relationship. I also loved that it was set in the southwest and based on real people. The character of Rabbit Layton was so fun. I felt her in my bones.

Do you have a funny story to share about the role?

I remember going to read for the role and it was put on tape. I had a hair appointment later that afternoon and dyed my hair red and the color didn’t come out right. I was resigned to having to wear it for a while but then got a call back and had that put-on tape as well. Up to this point, I hadn’t even met the director and got a call from him later that night offering me the role. I’ll never forget what he said: “You know, it might have just been the lighting, but on camera your hair looks pink” [laughs]. I admitted to him that it was and he asked if there was any way I could put it back to blonde. Give credit to the wonderful hairdresser because I had about five days to change it back.

Amanda Wyss – Gary Farmer

What were your thoughts when the film won the Filmmakers Trophy at Sundance?

It was thrilling. We didn’t celebrate it there but we knew it was special because its message and story was so powerful. I feel lucky to have played a part in telling it.

Do you ever foresee yourself getting on the other side of the camera at some point?

I have a strong desire to direct and hope that will be my next phase. I love the idea of not just having a microcosm of a movie as an actor but an overall view of the story and all of the little pieces. To be able to put people together on the same page as you are about the story you want to tell and how you want to tell it. I’d be very excited to do that.

What role would you consider to be your deepest dive as an actress?

One of my deepest dives was “The Id.” It was an extraordinary experience with people who protected and enabled me to go down a rabbit hole that was deep and messy. I felt totally safe because of the director of photography, the director and producer. It was a huge learning experience for me and a powerful, creative moment. I like playing characters with a dark side that gets revealed and feel very fortunate for the people who’ve given me the opportunities and roles I’ve been able to play.

Interview: Josh Malerman discusses The High Strung’s New Album, ‘Quiet Riots’ and writing ‘Bird Box’

Photo by Doug Coombe

Josh Malerman and the rest of adventure rockers The High Strung have unveiled the band’s eighth full-length release, Quiet Riots. The fourteen-track album is the group’s most harmony-laden to date, as it sees them reuniting with guitarist/vocalist Mark Owen, who’d been on hiatus for more than twelve years. Songs like the guitar-driven “Legion” and the effervescent “If You Wanna Roll” conjure up images of free-spirit and cross country drives, while tracks like “Riots Of The Mind” are a reminder that this world is still a very unsettled place.

The High Strung is: Josh Malerman (guitar/vocals), Mark Owen (guitar/vocals), Stephen Palmer (guitar), Chad Stocker (bass) and Derek Berk (drums).

Josh Malerman’s artistry not only lies within the craft of music but also as an acclaimed novelist. His post-apocalyptic thriller, “Bird Box,” a New York Times Bestseller, was recently adapted into a Netflix original feature. Since its release last December the film, which stars Sandra Bullock and John Malkovich, has become Netflix’s biggest hit to date.

AXS recently spoke with Malerman about The High Strung’s new album, Quiet Riots, “Bird Box” and more in this exclusive new interview.

AXS: How does the new album, Quiet Riots, relate to some of the band’s previous work?

Josh Malerman: This is the most harmony-laden album so far and a lot of it has to do with Stephen, our lead guitarist, who was more involved in this singing. Then there’s Mark Owen, one of our two singer-songwriters, who had left the band for twelve years and returned. For me, this will always be the album that was kickstarted by Mark’s return and our first real attempt at a harmony album.

AXS: What’s your songwriting process like?

JM: Usually either Mark or I will come in with a little hook of an idea. Whether it’s a chord change or a lyric one of us will bring it to the table and we’ll finish the song together. [Mark] Owen is also great at lyrics, and when you have a songwriting partner who cares so much about them as he does you can’t help but step up your game.

JM: Let’s talk about a few tracks from the new album beginning with “Riots Of The Mind.” What can you tell me about it?

JM: Mark brought that one to the table. It’s a wonderful way of saying things are crazy without being too hazy or political. There’s something pocket poetic about it. There’s a lot of crazy sh#t going on in the world right now and it would be wrong to not even wink in that direction.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Josh Malerman by Clicking Here!

Interview: Theresa Caputo discusses ‘Live! The Experience’ event coming to Bethlehem, PA

Photo: Alex Chaput

Theresa Caputo’s “Live! The Experience” is a one-of-a-kind event that connects the Long Island Medium with legions of loyal fans and skeptics from across the country. Each show is uniquely different in that it brings people from all walks of life together for an evening that’s spontaneously spiritual and, at times, beyond belief.

The New York Times Best-Selling Author and star of her acclaimed series, “Long Island Medium,”is about embarking on a whole new round of dates that will take her across the U.S. to deliver messages of hope while challenging cynics to believe that anything is possible. One of those stops will be a two-night stay at The Sands Event Center in Bethlehem, PA on Friday and Saturday, Feb. 1 and 2.

Caputo’s been sensing Spirit since she was a small child, but it wasn’t until she was in her twenties that she began to hone her intuitive, sixth-sense ability to put pieces of the puzzle together and help others to heal. Her “Live! The Experience” is certain to be an unforgettable evening.

AXS recently spoke with Theresa Caputo about her Live! The Experience event and more in this exclusive new interview.

AXS: What can fans expect from your upcoming “LIve! The Experience” events at The Sands Event Center in Bethlehem, PA?

Theresa Caputo: With the live show, I always tell people it’s just like watching “Long Island Medium,” but without the shopping [laughs]. I’m so proud of what we’ve been able to create and bring to the live show. Whether there are five people in the room or five-thousand, it’s all spontaneous. I start off the night like any other reading by coming out and giving a quick speech about what people can expect over the next two hours. Then Spirit starts communicating. I’ll leave the stage and whether it’s in the front row, back, or balcony, I’ll stop and deliver the message right in front of the person. We have big screens set up and cameras that follow me around so everyone feels a part of it. No matter where you’re seated you’ll be able to see the messages being delivered up close and personal. Every message provides so much healing. Spirit allows us to continue to go on with life no matter what we’ve been through. It lets us know that there’s more to life than just here in the physical world.

AXS: What do you think attracts people to your live events?

TC: One of the main things is that when a tragedy happens or when we lose someone we sometimes don’t understand why and lose our faith. This show restores that faith and gives hope. Another thing I’ve learned is that people come to the show because they’re skeptical or intrigued. But it doesn’t matter if people believe in what I do or not. I want them to believe in themselves and have their own connection. I want you to believe that all of the things you are feeling are real.

AXS: Was there ever a “wow” moment for you during these live events?

TC: It may sound cliché but with every reading, there are those moments. There are always things that happen where you’ll say, “There’s no way. How could this happen?” But what I do is so much more than just communicate with someone who has died. It reunites families and gives people a sense of peace they can’t get through anything else.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Theresa Caputo by Clicking Here!

Director Harrison Smith Talks ‘Death House,’ New Projects

When Harrison Smith agreed to co-write and direct the action/horror thriller, “Death House,” the filmmaker had one goal in mind: to make Gunnar Hansen’s intertwined vision of good and evil a consummate reality. The film’s premise, which brings many of the greatest horror icons together in one film, is a rollercoaster funhouse ride of scares and screams as well as a nod to the best of 80s horror.

In “Death House,” Agents Toria Boon (Cortney Palm) and Jae Novak (Cody Longo) are given a tour of a state of the art, government prison where medical and mental experiments are carried out on the worst of humanity by Drs. Eileen Fletcher (Dee Wallace) and Karen Redmane (Barbara Crampton). But when an unexpected power outage releases the monstrous inmates Boon and Novak, who are beginning to learn more about their own dark pasts, have to fight for survival through a labyrinth of horror. It all culminates in a final, violent showdown in the prison’s deepest level with a face to face encounter with The Five Evils.

In addition to a fun story and stellar cast, which includes Kane Hodder (“Friday The 13th”series), Tony Todd (“Candyman”), Sid Haig (“House of 1,000 Corpses”), and Felissa Rose (“Sleepaway Camp”), “Death House” also features a plethora of Easter eggs guaranteed to please even the most ardent horror fan.

I recently spoke with Harrison Smith about “Death House” and more in this exclusive new interview.

How did this project come about?

Gunnar had brought the idea of creating a movie with a who’s who of horror names to his agent, Michael Eisenstadt. His original script, called “Death House,” was about a group of college kids who create a documentary about going into an abandoned asylum. But when they get down into the bowels of the building, they discover that the patients have never really left. Instead, they’ve been living there as subterranean beings. Michael eventually got the script into the hands of Rick Finkelstein from Entertainment Factory, who then brought it to me. 

Gunnar Hansen

How did the script evolve into what would become the final film?

I met with Gunnar and the two of us started going over it. The whole documentary idea had been done before, but the one thing Gunnar really wanted retained was his vision that good and evil are intertwined and need each other. He told me he had this Biblical concept of these “Four Horsemen” so I suggested we change it up by adding a woman to finish out the points of a pentagram and calling them The Five Evils. Around that same time, the Super Bowl was airing the world debut trailer for “Jurassic World.” That’s when it hit me: why not make “Jurassic Park” without the dinosaurs? And instead of it being an asylum, let’s make it a prison. We’ll have a young group going on a tour when the ride breaks down and the monsters get out. That appealed to Gunnar. I took even more inspiration from the film, “Escape from New York.” Now we were able to put horror names in as real characters.

The sad thing was that during all this time, Gunnar never let on that he was dying. No one actually knew until a few weeks before he passed [Hansen died in 2015]. That was why he was emphatic about getting it done. I wanted to make sure I preserved his vision, and after reading the final draft Gunnar gave Rick his blessing.

Was there ever any thought given to having the horror icons reprise their famous character roles for “Death House”?

Never. When that idea was first pitched I made it clear I didn’t want to make anything like that. Just look at “Freddy Vs. Jason” as an example. That film went through fourteen drafts and took ten years to make, and that’s what we got? Just because you can do it doesn’t mean that you should.

What was the casting process like for “Death House?”

All of Gunnar’s friends had already told him they’d be on board, so it was a matter of finding a place for them. Robert Englund was also set to appear, and even went out of his way to try to make it happen, but by the time the money moved for filming he already had other commitments and just couldn’t do it.

What can you tell me about the addition of Cortney Palm to the project?

We originally had cast Bianca Bradey, from Wyrmwood, as Agent Toria Boon. She loved the script and we loved her. She’s Australian and we had everything set up with her visa, but it wasn’t going to carry over when it finally came time to shoot. I’ve always been a fan of Cortney’s work in “Sushi Girl” and it was also around the same time “Zombeavers” came out. She and I were Twitter friends so I reached out to her about it. She has charisma and a great look and delivery. She gave everything she had and is absolutely terrific in this film.

How would you describe the story of “Death House”?

I would describe it as a roller coaster ride through the fun house. It’s also a “flipping around cable in 1983 at 2 o’clock in the morning” kind of film. One where you come across it and you say to yourself, “Man, I’ve got to finish this!” That’s what I was going for. It’s very “Escape From New York” / John Carpenter-esque and a tip of the hat to that great 80s cheesy action horror. What’s interesting is that there’s also lot of stuff in the film that’s in the headlines again today, like Transhumanism, which is the idea that mental illness is contagious and can be spread through social media. It’s a smart script that ends with you asking questions, which is what every good film should do.

Are there plans to do a sequel?

“Death House 2: The Farm” is already written and in it we’ll start answering some questions. Like the shower scene where Agents Boon and Novak are asking about each other’s tattoos and the possibility of having memories erased. It all takes place on a farm that’s being used for human trafficking.

Are there any other projects you’re currently involved in?

Spilled Milk” is a screen play I wrote that’s based on the novel by K. L. Randis, which is her true account of surviving sexual abuse from her father. I was attracted to the story because of this woman’s plight and the whole #MeToo movement. I wanted to write it from the standpoint that it really is a horror movie because it’s real. The script is in the hands of a female director, which is where it should be. Most of all, I’m excited for Kelly to get her word out.

I’m also getting ready to shoot a quiet, horror film noire called “The Special,” which stars Damian Maffei [“The Strangers: Prey at Night”] and Sarah French playing the wife. It’s a story that was brought to me by Mark Streensland and James Newman. There’s dark elements, a little bit of revenge and some things you don’t see much of anymore. It also has some great practical make-up effects. I’m very excited about it. 

What would you like people to take away from watching “Death House?”

Gunnar wanted this film to be for his fans. He didn’t care about the critics or a Rotten Tomatoes score. What he wanted was for all the people who came to see him and paid money for his autograph to have something to be excited about. So, look at the crazy creatures that are in the freezer, enjoy Kane Hodder and watch for all the Easter eggs—especially the ending post credits sequence which features the best Easter egg ever. It’s Larry Zerner, who played Shelly in “Friday The 13th: Part 3.” And for people who may not know much about classic horror, hopefully watching “Death House” will make them want to go back and learn more. “Death House” is for the fans, so have fun and enjoy it.

Death House” is available now on Digital, Streaming, DVD and Blu-Ray.

‘Death House’: Actress Cortney Palm Discusses All-Star Horror Fueled Adventure

During an exclusive tour of a nine-level, secret prison known as “Death House,” agents Toria Boon (Cortney Palm) and Jae Novak (Cody Longo) become trapped inside its walls after a power outage frees a ruthless army of the world’s most dangerously maniacal prisoners. Trapped in the labyrinth of horror, the agents must push to the facility’s lowest depths, where they’ll come face to face with a supernatural group and discover a dark secret about themselves.

The premise for the B. Harrison Smith directed feature was originally based on a concept by the late Gunnar Hansen (“The Texas Chainsaw Massacre”) intended to bring as many horror legends together in one film. That’s why, in addition to appealing performances of Palm and Longo, “Death House” features a plethora of iconic horror stars from the mid-70’s to present day, including Kane Hodder (“Friday The 13th”series), Dee Wallace (“Cujo” “The Hills Have Eyes”), Barbara Crampton (“Re-Animator”), Tony Todd (“Candyman”), Bill Moseley (“House of 1,000 Corpses”), Michael Berryman (“The Hills Have Eyes”) and Felissa Rose (“Sleepaway Camp”).

As an actress, Cortney Palm has a knack for playing strong, female characters (just check out the beautiful artist’s work in 2012’s “Sushi Girl”) and Agent Boon is another convincing role that’s right in her wheelhouse.

“Death House” is more than just an “Expendables of Horror” film. It’s a gripping tale of good versus evil, the dangers of experimentation, the macabre, and how things are not always what they appear to be.

I recently spoke with Cortney Palm about her role in “Death House” and more in this exclusive new interview.

How did this project come about for you?

In this age of social media people have different ways of reaching out and giving you information about opportunities. In this case, the original lead for the film had to unexpectedly drop out. They were going to start filming and I received a Twitter message from [director] Harrison Smith telling me they were looking for someone. I read the script and was immediately excited. It was a fun, in-depth story about good and evil. About finding what it takes to face your inner demon and coming out on top. I called my agent, flew out a few days later and we made it happen.

What was it about the script that intrigued you the most? Was it the idea of having so many horror icons attached to the project?

Originally, I didn’t know it was being pitched with a lot of horror icons attached to the screenplay. What drew me to the story the most was the strong female lead. I’m always attracted to characters who don’t take anything from anyone else and who can stand on their own two feet. 

How would you describe your character, Agent Toria Boon?

She’s a very by the books kind of person. She’s a daddy’s girl, but daddy really wanted a boy. As a result, she’s had to step up her game and trained hard for what she’s doing. As the story unfolds she realizes there’s something she hasn’t been told. Everything is snowballing all at once and she’s not really sure who to believe or trust. She has to follow he intuition and think things through as they happen. She’s figuring out how to survive while at the same time, visions of “Who Am I” keep racing through her mind. There’s also a dynamic, female power trip going on within the film. It’s about who’s on top and who’s going to be the manipulator. The women all have to fight for a place. They all have to be there for each other but it’s still about who’s bite is bigger.

How would you describe the story of “Death House?”

It’s a crazy roller coaster ride, so stay in the cart and keep your legs and hands inside at all times. The story goes into the idea of what happened back in the Fifties and Sixties when the government was performing tests on people. It also dives deep into what it means to have good and evil in the world. The yin and the yang.

What was it like working with Harrison Smith?

Harrison was once a history teacher and was such a good mediator at getting us all to the table and keeping us on the same page. For any issues we had to overcome he was the hub and teacher who kept everyone grounded. He also gave us the freedom to innovate and try new things. Some of that inspiration took the story deeper than what we originally expected.

What did you enjoy most about making “Death House?”

I loved the prison location. There was a lot of energy there that was indescribable, but not necessarily good or bad. People have actually been burned and murdered there and there were also riots. It was dark and there were some really cold, long shoots. It was a lot of work but the prison made it magical.

Are there any other projects you’re currently working on?

A film I shot a few years ago, “Sunflower,” is getting distributed in the middle of 2019. I also recently wrapped a father-daughter drama called “Two Cents from a Pariah” as well as a voice over for a psychological thriller called “Purple.”  Another film, “Herringbone,” just won the online Sydney Lift Off film festival and is in the festival circuit. It’s a touching tale about two women struggling to survive captivity and torture, as it represents the dairy industry. I’ll also start filming a movie called “Bleed Millions,” that’s directed by Sam Koze, in January. It’s an interesting story about a psychopathic individual who uses the blood of his victims to paint works of art.

Have you ever thought about getting on the other side of the camera someday – either as a writer or director?

I’d definitely consider it. It’s really a matter of finding the right projects. I have a few ideas for a film about unity and casting children as leads. We’ve gotten away from our innocence and the nature of just accepting and being present. That’s something I’d like to explore.

What are you looking forward to the most in 2019?

I’m excited about expanding my horizons and meeting people who are more about the human condition and how it’s represented in film and in our daily lives. Instead of being caught up with unsubstantiated hate towards one another or victimizing ourselves or others, I want to focus on waking up to a collective consciousness. Having people realize their true selves and the beauty the world has to offer. I’m looking forward to helping to influence people in positive ways to make changes so our world can become better place. 

Death House” is available now on Digital, Streaming, DVD and Blu-Ray.