Category: Women Who Rock

Interview: Actress Katie Callaway Discusses Her Versatile Career

It’s not often you meet a woman with the trifecta success of musical theater, film and television, but such is the case for Katie Callaway.

The beautiful actress began her journey studying classical ballet before attending Belmont University and graduating with a BFA in Musical Theatre. During her time there, Callaway appeared in no less than six different musical productions, including the first ever collegiate production of “Les Misérables.” She also wrote, directed, and starred in her senior thesis production of a one-act comedic musical parody of “The Hunger Games.”

With a powerful vocal equaled only by her acting prowess and charm, Callaway served as a key participant in several master classes and workshops by such notable Broadway influences as Jason Robert Brown (“The Last Five Years,” “Songs for a New World”), Benj Pasek & Justin Paul (“Edges,” “Dogfight,” and “A Christmas Story”) and Jen Waldman (Artistic Director at the Hangar Theatre and a part of the Original Broadway Cast of “Wicked”).

As a film and television actress, Callaway’s impressive list of credits includes a recurring role on ABC / Lionsgate’s “Nashville,” as well as being featured in films like “The Clapper” and “Prize Fighter.” She’s also branched out into commercial work and music videos as well. Her latest film, “Inheritance,” is slated for release in 2020.

I recently spoke with Katie Callaway about her career and life in this exclusive new interview.

Did you always know that you wanted to have a career in the arts and entertainment?

Katie Callaway: Absolutely. I’ve always loved performing and the theater and stage. I started really young in life studying classical ballet, and didn’t think being an actress could be a viable career until I was in my pre-teens. That’s when I asked my mom and dad to get me an agent and some head shots. I remember they were a little hesitant at first, but it’s always been on my radar and something that I loved to do. Following your passion and dreams isn’t selfish. It’s a responsibility.

What was it that attracted you to theater?

KC: I’m a big fan of stories and being able to have that one on one, call and response connection with an audience when something beautiful or dramatic happens on stage. There’s something magical about live theater and having an intimate relationship with the people you’re performing for.

You’ve done live theater, movies, commercials and television. As an actress, what are some of the similarities and differences?

KC: They’re all different but it’s all the art of performance. The beauty about live theater is the adrenaline rush you get knowing you only have one shot to get it right. Every night is completely different. In film or TV commercials you might do the take a few times, but once it’s locked in you can put it to bed. You can do a live show twenty to thirty times and still find new ways of falling in love with the character.

Are there any projects you’re currently working on?

KC: I recently filmed an episode of “General Hospital” that aired this past July, which was very exciting. I also have a supporting role in a thriller starring Lily Collins and Simon Pegg called “Inheritance” that’s slated to be released in 2020. There are a few other exciting things coming up that I can’t really discuss except to say stay tuned!

What’s the biggest lesson you’ve learned about yourself as an artist so far?

KC: It’s hard to pick just one thing but I find out more about myself as an artist by the characters I portray. The arts are about questioning the status quo, relying on things that have happened in the past, thinking about what lies ahead and then using the art of storytelling to share it.

What excites you the most about this next phase of your career?

KC: One thing I’m looking forward to is the opportunity to travel for different roles. It’s nice that the hub doesn’t always have to be L.A. anymore. I’m excited to get more stamps on my passport and seeing different parts of the world.

What’s the best bit of advice you can give to someone who may just be starting out?

KC: Keep your foot on the gas. If it’s something you feel called to do then don’t let anyone tell you that you can’t. It’s a viable career for anyone as long as you’re willing to put in the hard work. There’s a lot to be said for talent and networking but at the end of the day it’s all about perseverance. Always work to better your skillset and self as a human being. We need to follow the things we’re called to do.

Interview: Savannah Outen Discusses Her Infectious New Single, ‘The Hard Way’

In the years since Savannah Outen’s began her artistic journey at the age of fifteen the beautiful songstress has found unprecedented musical success. For, in addition to becoming a fixture on the Radio Disney charts her ubiquitous renditions of various cover songs have garnered her more than 120 million views on YouTube.

Last year, Outen’s hauntingly ethereal track, “Sad In The Summer” spoke about letting go of the past and finding freedom. With her infectious new track, “The Hard Way,” the beautiful artist has managed to discover something else — a sound like no other.

Not only does “The Hard Way” feature Outen’s hook-laden melodies and distinctly powerful vocal prowess but the track showcases a deep level of emotional artistic maturity, proving that she’s becoming an even bigger force to be reckoned with.

I recently spoke with Outen about “The Hard Way,” songwriting and more in this exclusive new interview.

How did the new single, “The Hard Way,” originate?

Savannah Outen: For this track, I was in the studio with writer, Adam Melchor, and producer, Giulio Cercato. It was the first time the three of us had worked together and there were great vibes right from the start. I like to live a song before I write about it and that day we were all venting about the music industry and our individual takes and experiences. I was telling them how long I’ve been pursuing music and that there was a period I went through where I was feeling a little bit of doubt. We started with that idea. There’s a phase in your life when you’re in your twenties and maybe just getting out of college. A time when you love what you do but nothing’s happening. It’s a song telling you to keep going and trust your gut. Even if it takes longer than you thought. We wanted it to be fun but not too serious, with a cool 60’s/70’s vibe. It’s a song about my life and I’m so glad it’s out for everyone to hear.

What was the recording process like?

SO: Since we already knew what we wanted to say we needed to find a groove to match. The thing I love about this track is that it steers in the sonic direction of where I’m going. I loved infusing synths and live instruments and diving deeper into a gritty alternative world.

What can you tell me about the video for “The Hard Way?”

SO: I made the video with a great friend of mine, Ryan Espinosa. The video is fun and lighthearted and I even got my band involved. The cool thing is the song, artwork and video were all done with people that are close to me, which makes it even more special.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Savannah Outen by Clicking Here!

‘Mixtape’: Executive Producer Natalie Barandes Discusses Infectious New AXS TV Series

One of the coolest, and most revealing, classic rock series has got to be AXS TV’s new star-studded “Mixtape,” which airs Thursday nights at 8:30pE/5:30pP.

Dubbed the story of a musical artist’s life through the songs that they love each of the eight-episode series shines a light on a different rock icon as they sit down to discuss some of their favorite songs of all time. In doing so, they not only share a personal playlist of music that shaped their lives but also tell stories of how the songs impacted their own musical trajectory. They also reveal things about themselves you may never have heard before.

The debut season includes appearances by such legendary artists as Mick Jones & Kelly Hansen (Foreigner), Kevin Cronin and Dave Amato (REO Speedwagon), Rick Springfield, Don McLean, Robby Krieger (The Doors) and Micky Dolenz (The Monkees). For fans of the classic rock genre this is a series and musical celebration that is not to be missed.

I recently spoke to executive producer and Natalie Barandes (Founder/Creative Chief Joy Factory) about “Mixtape,” her career and much more in this exclusive new interview.

What inspired the new AXS TV series, “Mixtape?” How did it all come about?

Natalie Barandes: I have a friend from high school who I used to trade mix tapes with. She’s always been a collector and one day she brought me over a stack of them. They had so much great music on them. I remember listening to them and seeing the variation of how it went from one song to the next to the next. It was a story of my life. That’s when I thought this could be a great format to profile a musical artist and the songs they grew up with and loved. We could understand them on a whole different level.

What’s the format of the show?

NB: Every episode has the same four-chapter format: Influences, The Rise, then the Deep Dive, which is a defining moment that usually has a nugget you may not know about. It ends with Today and Tomorrow, which is what’s going on with the artist right now and what they’re listening to. 

What were some of the interesting things you discovered while working on the show?

NB: When you look at the artists in the series as a whole you see a lot of similarities in age and musical influences, but then you realize how different their career trajectories became. For example, Mick Jones [Foreigner] talks about Buddy Holly and then so does Don McLean. They both had a lot of love for the same guy but had very different careers. On the classic rock side you can see The Beatles were a huge influence, but there’s also a lot pre-Beatles music that was important to their careers, like Cliff Richard and Gerry and The Pacemakers.

Photo courtesy AXS TV – Joy Factory

What were some of the challenges of putting together the series?

NB: I had to do an extensive amount of research and we were tied to a tight budget, timeline and turnaround. Once we booked the artist I had about ninety minutes to take a journey into their lives and the music that inspired them. It was a challenge but once we were in the room together it was amazing.

Was having a career in entertainment something you always envisioned?

NB: Absolutely. I grew up in New York and my family was in the entertainment business. My father and uncle were both involved in Broadway Theater so I saw everything when I was growing up. In the 80s I had the opportunity to work for MTV and did weekend promos for a few years. That formulated my background. Then when I moved to Los Angeles in the 90s a lot of my early work was doing video profiles for record labels where I did a lot of amazing interviews.

Are there any other projects you’re currently working on?

NB: One of the things we’re working on is taking the concept of “Mixtape” and playlist and expanding it into multiple genres, like “Mixtape Country,” “Mixtape RnB, Hip-hop.” There’s even interest in “Mixtape Gospel and Christian” as well as “Mixtape Comedy,” where comedians tell stories about their lives through the comedy that they love.

What satisfies you the most about “Mixtape” and what would you like viewers to take away from watching?

NB: I remember after we finished filming the episode with Kevin Cronin and Dave Amato from REO Speedwagon, I came out with tears in my eyes and told someone that I have the best job in the world. I got to sit five feet away from a band I loved growing up and talked music. The same goes for Mick Jones and Kelly Hansen from Foreigner, or getting to listen to Don McLean sing “American Pie.” These are songs that were my favorites growing up. “Mixtape” is an absolute gift for anyone who loves music and my hope is the show opens your mind to how much wonderful music there is in the world. Some of which you may never even knew existed.

 “Mixtape” airs Thursday nights at 8:30pE / 5:30pP on AXS TV.

Interview: Emma Taylor Discusses Her Ethereal New Single, ‘For Forever’

Following the release of her infectious single, “My Dear,” and having taking some time off to finish her education, singer-songwriter Emma Taylor is back with a powerful new track. The ubiquitously-charged, “For Forever.”

The single, inspired from stories the songstress heard from friends about unhappy relationships, is both poignant and poetic. Moreover, it’s a track that, when stripped to its barest of essentials, resonates deep with emotion and energy — both a key to Taylor’s signature sound. At its core, “For Forever” is a song that not only yearns for repeated listenings but also showcases the depth of maturity in Taylor’s vocal and artistic prowess.

I recently spoke with Taylor about the new single, her songwriting and much more in this exclusive new interview.

How did the new single, ‘For Forever’ come about?

Emma Taylor: All my songs have an underlying theme of love, loss and relationships. I love telling stories or taking a small emotion and creating an entire song out of it. I’m at the age where my friends have been dating guys or trying to date guys. Some of them are unhappy but will tell me they’re scared of being alone. I took that idea. It’s a song about being in a toxic relationship with someone but not willing to take the risk of being alone because you’re so used to being comfortable. It’s uncomfortable to have change in your life, and it’s something everyone can relate to. Not just with love but in taking risks in their careers. I drew all those emotions and put it into the song.

What else can you tell me about the writing and recording process?

ET: The basis of the song and the skeleton happened so naturally. Originally, “For Forever” was just a placeholder title. I tried to find different words but I just couldn’t get it out of my head. I remember when I first had the chorus and melody and posted the idea on Instagram. It sounds the same now as it did then. You know a song is going to be digestible if it sounds good with just guitar and vocals. If you can break it down and it still has depth you know it’s going to be special. This is such a deep song and I want people to just listen to the words and story.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Emma Taylor by Clicking Here.

Interview: Liv Warfield Discusses Her Emotional New Single, ‘Mantra’

From her days as a member of Prince’s New Power Generation to her acclaimed solo career and time fronting Roadcase Royale, her ubiquitously cool project with Nancy Wilson (Heart), there can be no denying that powerhouse vocalist Liv Warfield is a force of to be reckoned with. As evidenced by her emotionally-charged new single, “Mantra.”

Written by Warfield along with longtime friend and guitarist Ryan Waters, the song is a roller coaster ride of blues and soul, and equally as honest in its surreality.

Backed by Waters’ tasty guitar prowess and a 42-piece orchestra (arranged by Grammy-winning conductor, Mateo Messina), “Mantra” not only showcases the artist’s unique and powerful vocal range but is also an undying message of hope.

The song, which took nearly four years to complete, and had even piqued the interest of Prince himself shortly before his passing, is indicative of an artist who’s found her musical foundation.

I recently spoke with Warfield about “Mantra”, her work with Roadcase Royale, Prince and much more in this exclusive new interview.

How did “Mantra” come about?

Liv Warfield: As an independent artist, we’re always trying to find the next thing. Ryan Waters and I had the song in an infant stage around the same time I had the chance to open-up for Heart. Prince was still alive at the time and when he heard the song he was wowed by it. The song is full of emotional highs and low and the lyrics are what I was feeling. It’s taken four years to complete but I think everyone can relate to the song’s roller coaster ride.

I have to ask you, what was it like working with Prince?

LW: It was incredible and an experience like no other. There’s so many emotions I feel across the board whenever I think of him. He was a teacher, a mentor and a friend. One of the best experiences for me was being able to watch him on stage. Just the energy he put off to everyone. You couldn’t help but just freeze in the moment. It was magic and I miss him every single day.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Liv Warfield by Clicking Here!

Interview: Singer-Songwriter Brooke Josephson Discusses Her Upcoming New York City Performance, New Music

Brooke Josephson

Read the rest of my
Interview with Brooke Josephson by Clicking Here.

‘Powwow Highway’: Actress Amanda Wyss Discusses Films 30th Anniversary And Continued Relevancy

Still powerful in its message and poignant in its relevancy more than thirty years after its release “Powwow Highway,” based on the novel by David Seals, remains one of the most timeless and significant films about the indigenous struggle to preserve their native culture.

The film tells the story of Native American Philbert Bono (Gary Farmer), a reflective and loveable man seeking to gain higher identity through the use of mystical and traditional means. His friend and Vietnam War veteran, Buddy Red Bow (A Martinez), is an adversarial social activist trying desperately to protect what’s left of his Cheyenne Reservation from government interlopers and greedy land developers.

The story takes a unique turn when the duo goes on an unexpected road trip in a rusted-out car to rescue Red Bow’s sister, Bonnie (Joanelle Romero), who’s been wrongly accused and arrested in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Along their journey, Red Bow’s hard-edged view of life and the world around him is put to the test by Philbert’s resolve and undying faith. Together they will learn the true meaning of their heritage, friendship and love.

The award-winning film, which includes the coveted Filmmakers Trophy at the 1989 Sundance Film Festival, was produced by late Beatle George Harrison and features a rich soundtrack that includes songs by Robbie Robertson, U2 and Creedence Clearwater Revival.

Amanda Wyss, who’s intense portrayal of the flawed Meridith Lane in the 2015 psychological thriller, “The Id,” is equally as brilliant in “Powwow Highway” as Rabbit Layton, a fiery Texan who plays an important role in the film’s climatic third act.

Although filmed in the late 1980s, the messages behind “Powwow Highway” tragically continues to stand the test of time.

I recently spoke with Wyss about the 30th anniversary of “Powwow Highway” and more in this exclusive new interview.

When you look back on “Powwow Highway” with so much perspective what thoughts come to mind?

It doesn’t feel like thirty years have gone by because I remember it as if it were yesterday. It was exciting on so many levels. First, it was based on real characters and we had an amazing cast of brilliant actors like Gary Farmer, A Martinez and Joanelle Romero. George Harrison produced it and Robbie Robertson was doing the music. We filmed it as a road movie in Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota and New Mexico and everyone became immersed in the story.

Why do you think the film remains timeless and relevant so many years later?

It’s amazing and tragic at how so little has changed. That’s why it remains so relevant. From working on the film, I learned a lot about the activism side and how hard different reservations have to fight against the government just to maintain their land, culture and resources. I walked away from the film with a deeper respect for the people fighting to protect and preserve what they have left. It’s made a lifelong impact on me. But we all share a similar deep connection. Jonathan Wacks [director] went on to teach film at the College of Santa Fe for many years. Joanelle also goes there a lot. She created The Red Nation Film Festival, which showcases indigenous filmmakers. She’s a great actress, singer-songwriter and mother.

What initially attracted you to the story?

I was sent the script and knew right away it was a part I had to play. I loved Philbert Bono (Gary Farmer) and the character of Buddy Red Bow (A Martinez) and their relationship. I also loved that it was set in the southwest and based on real people. The character of Rabbit Layton was so fun. I felt her in my bones.

Do you have a funny story to share about the role?

I remember going to read for the role and it was put on tape. I had a hair appointment later that afternoon and dyed my hair red and the color didn’t come out right. I was resigned to having to wear it for a while but then got a call back and had that put-on tape as well. Up to this point, I hadn’t even met the director and got a call from him later that night offering me the role. I’ll never forget what he said: “You know, it might have just been the lighting, but on camera your hair looks pink” [laughs]. I admitted to him that it was and he asked if there was any way I could put it back to blonde. Give credit to the wonderful hairdresser because I had about five days to change it back.

Amanda Wyss – Gary Farmer

What were your thoughts when the film won the Filmmakers Trophy at Sundance?

It was thrilling. We didn’t celebrate it there but we knew it was special because its message and story was so powerful. I feel lucky to have played a part in telling it.

Do you ever foresee yourself getting on the other side of the camera at some point?

I have a strong desire to direct and hope that will be my next phase. I love the idea of not just having a microcosm of a movie as an actor but an overall view of the story and all of the little pieces. To be able to put people together on the same page as you are about the story you want to tell and how you want to tell it. I’d be very excited to do that.

What role would you consider to be your deepest dive as an actress?

One of my deepest dives was “The Id.” It was an extraordinary experience with people who protected and enabled me to go down a rabbit hole that was deep and messy. I felt totally safe because of the director of photography, the director and producer. It was a huge learning experience for me and a powerful, creative moment. I like playing characters with a dark side that gets revealed and feel very fortunate for the people who’ve given me the opportunities and roles I’ve been able to play.

Interview: Janet Gardner discusses departure from Vixen, solo career and new music

When vocalist/guitarist Janet Gardner announced that her departure from Vixen this past January, it came as a bit of a surprise. After all the band, known for hits like “Edge of A Broken Heart,” “Cryin’” and “Rev It Up,” had just completed another successful year of touring as well as releasing a new live album – the aptly titled, ‘Live Fire.’

For Gardner, the decision to leave didn’t come easy. Following her marriage to guitarist Justin James and the release of her acclaimed self-titled solo album, the blonde songstress spent the beginning of 2018 being rushed into emergency surgery to relieve a subdural hematoma. Her recovery was quickly followed by a string of solo U.K. shows before rejoining Vixen for even more live dates. This coupled with the process of juggling a regular job at home and raising her son had made scheduling too difficult. Something had to give.

There were no hard feelings with the split and Vixen, which consists of Share Ross (bass), Roxy Petrucci (drums) and Britt Lightning (guitars), will continue to carry on with Lorraine Lewis (Femme Fatale) joining the ranks on lead vocals.

n the meantime, Gardner is concentrating on her solo career and has nearly completed a follow-up album with James she hopes to release in the spring. Expect to see her out on the road in support of the new music as well as continuing to perform the hits she helped make famous.

AXS recently spoke with Janet Gardner about her decision to leave Vixen, new music and more in this exclusive interview.

AXS: What prompted your decision to leave Vixen and concentrate on your solo career?

Janet Gardner: Last year was insane for me. It started off in January when we were on a solo run out West and I had to have emergency brain surgery. I made up all of the missed shows and then did a U.K. run. Then Vixen started and we did even more great stuff. When I finally came up for air I was back home to my regular job, taking care of my son and all the other things that I do, and realized I was missing out on a lot because of scheduling. I had to make a decision.

AXS: Was this something that had been weighing on you for some time?

JG: Absolutely. I definitely wanted to make it work. They [Vixen] had made concessions for me when I needed to do things and I would feel bad about holding them back. I remember one time being stuck in a Detroit airport for eight hours and missing my son’s middle-school graduation. It’s hard to leave my family but I don’t want to keep Vixen from doing what they want to do. It was a tough call.

AXS: What are some of your best memories with the band?

JG: There’s been quite a few. Opening for Scorpions was our first arena tour and the first night of that tour was surreal. When I heard “Edge of A Broken Heart” on the radio for the very first time and our record went gold was another dream come true. They’re all good memories.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Janet Gardner by Clicking Here!

Interview: Madame Mayhem Discusses New Single, ‘Broken’, Memorable Moments

Co-written with Breaking Benjamin’s Keith Wallen, Manhattan-born singer/songwriter Madame Mayhem is back with her infectious new single, “Broken.”

The new track, which features the powerful rhythm section of Billy Sheehan (Mr. Big, Winery Dogs) and Ray Luzier (Korn, KXM) continues the dynamically gifted artist’s trend of delivering infectious melodies, hard-hitting rhythms and soaring vocals.

AXS recently spoke with Madame Mayhem about “Broken” and more in this exclusive new interview.

AXS: How did your new single, “Broken,” come about?

Madame Mayhem: It’s always cool when you can collaborate with people who hold you accountable and can bring something of their own to the table as well. I’ve written a bunch of songs with Keith Wallen and “Broken” is one that came out of those sessions. I always like it when listeners can relate to a song in their own way. For me, “Broken” is a song about the feeling you get when you’re in a relationship with someone and both of you know it’s over, but both of you are afraid to admit it.

AXS: What was the writing process like?

MM: I always say this but it’s true: there’s really no one set way to write. I could go in with a bunch of lyrics and Keith may have a bunch of riffs. Sometimes we may use them and other times we may just scratch it all together and talk about what we’re feeling right now. We’ll both come prepared but sometimes it can all go out the window and we’ll start with something new. It’s very organic.

AXS: Where do you draw inspiration for your lyrics?

MM: The lyrics usually come from the struggles and frustrations I’ve been through. It’s therapeutic to get the song out, and when I hear people say that they feel the same way it makes me feel that I’m not alone. It’s writing from truth.

Read the rest of my
Interview with Madame Mayhem by Clicking here!

‘Death House’: Actress Cortney Palm Discusses All-Star Horror Fueled Adventure

During an exclusive tour of a nine-level, secret prison known as “Death House,” agents Toria Boon (Cortney Palm) and Jae Novak (Cody Longo) become trapped inside its walls after a power outage frees a ruthless army of the world’s most dangerously maniacal prisoners. Trapped in the labyrinth of horror, the agents must push to the facility’s lowest depths, where they’ll come face to face with a supernatural group and discover a dark secret about themselves.

The premise for the B. Harrison Smith directed feature was originally based on a concept by the late Gunnar Hansen (“The Texas Chainsaw Massacre”) intended to bring as many horror legends together in one film. That’s why, in addition to appealing performances of Palm and Longo, “Death House” features a plethora of iconic horror stars from the mid-70’s to present day, including Kane Hodder (“Friday The 13th”series), Dee Wallace (“Cujo” “The Hills Have Eyes”), Barbara Crampton (“Re-Animator”), Tony Todd (“Candyman”), Bill Moseley (“House of 1,000 Corpses”), Michael Berryman (“The Hills Have Eyes”) and Felissa Rose (“Sleepaway Camp”).

As an actress, Cortney Palm has a knack for playing strong, female characters (just check out the beautiful artist’s work in 2012’s “Sushi Girl”) and Agent Boon is another convincing role that’s right in her wheelhouse.

“Death House” is more than just an “Expendables of Horror” film. It’s a gripping tale of good versus evil, the dangers of experimentation, the macabre, and how things are not always what they appear to be.

I recently spoke with Cortney Palm about her role in “Death House” and more in this exclusive new interview.

How did this project come about for you?

In this age of social media people have different ways of reaching out and giving you information about opportunities. In this case, the original lead for the film had to unexpectedly drop out. They were going to start filming and I received a Twitter message from [director] Harrison Smith telling me they were looking for someone. I read the script and was immediately excited. It was a fun, in-depth story about good and evil. About finding what it takes to face your inner demon and coming out on top. I called my agent, flew out a few days later and we made it happen.

What was it about the script that intrigued you the most? Was it the idea of having so many horror icons attached to the project?

Originally, I didn’t know it was being pitched with a lot of horror icons attached to the screenplay. What drew me to the story the most was the strong female lead. I’m always attracted to characters who don’t take anything from anyone else and who can stand on their own two feet. 

How would you describe your character, Agent Toria Boon?

She’s a very by the books kind of person. She’s a daddy’s girl, but daddy really wanted a boy. As a result, she’s had to step up her game and trained hard for what she’s doing. As the story unfolds she realizes there’s something she hasn’t been told. Everything is snowballing all at once and she’s not really sure who to believe or trust. She has to follow he intuition and think things through as they happen. She’s figuring out how to survive while at the same time, visions of “Who Am I” keep racing through her mind. There’s also a dynamic, female power trip going on within the film. It’s about who’s on top and who’s going to be the manipulator. The women all have to fight for a place. They all have to be there for each other but it’s still about who’s bite is bigger.

How would you describe the story of “Death House?”

It’s a crazy roller coaster ride, so stay in the cart and keep your legs and hands inside at all times. The story goes into the idea of what happened back in the Fifties and Sixties when the government was performing tests on people. It also dives deep into what it means to have good and evil in the world. The yin and the yang.

What was it like working with Harrison Smith?

Harrison was once a history teacher and was such a good mediator at getting us all to the table and keeping us on the same page. For any issues we had to overcome he was the hub and teacher who kept everyone grounded. He also gave us the freedom to innovate and try new things. Some of that inspiration took the story deeper than what we originally expected.

What did you enjoy most about making “Death House?”

I loved the prison location. There was a lot of energy there that was indescribable, but not necessarily good or bad. People have actually been burned and murdered there and there were also riots. It was dark and there were some really cold, long shoots. It was a lot of work but the prison made it magical.

Are there any other projects you’re currently working on?

A film I shot a few years ago, “Sunflower,” is getting distributed in the middle of 2019. I also recently wrapped a father-daughter drama called “Two Cents from a Pariah” as well as a voice over for a psychological thriller called “Purple.”  Another film, “Herringbone,” just won the online Sydney Lift Off film festival and is in the festival circuit. It’s a touching tale about two women struggling to survive captivity and torture, as it represents the dairy industry. I’ll also start filming a movie called “Bleed Millions,” that’s directed by Sam Koze, in January. It’s an interesting story about a psychopathic individual who uses the blood of his victims to paint works of art.

Have you ever thought about getting on the other side of the camera someday – either as a writer or director?

I’d definitely consider it. It’s really a matter of finding the right projects. I have a few ideas for a film about unity and casting children as leads. We’ve gotten away from our innocence and the nature of just accepting and being present. That’s something I’d like to explore.

What are you looking forward to the most in 2019?

I’m excited about expanding my horizons and meeting people who are more about the human condition and how it’s represented in film and in our daily lives. Instead of being caught up with unsubstantiated hate towards one another or victimizing ourselves or others, I want to focus on waking up to a collective consciousness. Having people realize their true selves and the beauty the world has to offer. I’m looking forward to helping to influence people in positive ways to make changes so our world can become better place. 

Death House” is available now on Digital, Streaming, DVD and Blu-Ray.