Tag: Movies

‘Earworm’: Filmmaker Tara Price Discusses Her Latest Horror/Sci-Fi Short

Tara Price

When a reclusive man is repeatedly woken up over the course of a night by severe headaches, accompanied by musical repetition from an unknown source, his sanity begins to swiftly unravel.

The premise for writer/director Tara Price’s new short film, “Earworm”, is more than just a sinister play on words. It’s an eerily captivating, empathetic look at a man losing grip with his own reality. In mere minutes, Price is able to effectively weave a compelling web of cringe-worthy horror and uncertainty, while taking the viewer on a wild, emotional thrill ride.

The film, which stars veteran actor Ernest L. Thomas (“What’s Happening!!,” “Everybody Hates Chris” and “Malcolm X”) is as infectious as it is unsettling.

In addition to already being an acclaimed actress, Price wrote, produced, and starred in the award-winning, sci-fi short, “The Routine”, which was an “Official Selection” in thirty film festivals worldwide as well as being a nine-time award winner. “Earworm” is her directorial debut.

With endless enthusiasm and a profound knack for uniquely capturing a vision from written page to screen, Price is one to watch in 2018.

I recently spoke with Tara Price about “Earworm” and more in this exclusive new interview.

Where did the idea for “Earworm” originate?

I’ve written and produced several short films in the past, but this was the first one that I wrote with me specially wanting to direct. The whole concept behind it is actually a play on words. I’ve used the word “earworm” many times in my vocabulary. It means when you get a song stuck in your head. But what I’ve discovered over the years is that many people hear the word and relate it to “tapeworm” or “ringworm”. They don’t realize that it’s about music being stuck in your head. I thought it would be great to make a movie about both of those things.

Was the idea always for it to be a short film, or did you have something more feature-length in mind?

All of my other films were under ten minutes, so I always knew that it would be short. I like my material to pack a punch and end on a good beat. I’ve had people suggest that I make “Earworm” into a feature and I’m always flattered, but it was never meant to be one.

How did Ernest Thomas become involved in the film?

Ernie and I had worked together as actors in the past. All of our scenes were together so whenever there was downtime, we would spend it by hanging out and getting to know each other. He’s so kind, funny, generous and down to Earth. He’s also got an iconic smile that you immediately recognize. Ernie’s known primarily as a comedic actor, but he has such a great face for drama. I didn’t write the script with Ernie in mind, and I wasn’t even sure if it was going to be about a man or a woman. Ultimately, I decided it would be interesting to have a seasoned actor in the role, and Ernie was the first one who popped in my head. I shot him an email and was really lucky when he said yes. We had always hoped to work together again, and it was a wonderful thing.

What was the filming process like for “Earworm”?

We shot the entire film in one day. It was exhausting, but tons of credit goes to my team of people and to Ernie, because they never lost their momentum. I also had a wonderful producer, Billy Hanson. I’m so indebted to him for believing in this script and for being a great partner. To have someone that solid in your corner who believes in and trusts in you is so important.

Tara Price & Ernest Thomas

As a first-time director, what was the biggest challenge?

This may sound silly, but sometimes just believing in yourself can be the hardest thing. The idea of directing can be intimidating, but I was fortunate to have many positive influences in my life and a lot of people encouraging me. Directing sounds scary and is a lot of work, but it’s easier when you have a good script, go in with a plan and surround yourself with top-notch people.

How has the reaction been to “Earworm”?

It’s been great. I love going to festivals and sitting in the back and watching he audience. There’s one scene I won’t give away where the audience always shrieks [laughs]. It’s my favorite part.

What’s next for the film?

It’s recently screened in New York and Berlin and will be playing at the Indie Horror Film Festival in Illinois in March. It’s already been in forty-eight film festivals and has won seven awards.

Was a filmmaker something you always aspired to do?

Initially, I wanted to be an actor and moved to L.A. in pursuit of it. I always liked to write, but did it mostly to help me as an actor. Eventually, people started telling me that I should try directing. I was hesitant at first, but once I did everything else paled in comparison. It’s exciting to write something and then bring your vision to life. But it wouldn’t be possible without having a great team of people who bring everything they’ve got to the table.

Are there any other projects you’re currently working on?

I’ve recently directed a music video for the song that’s from “Earworm” – “The Worst Thing”. It’s a completely separate entity that has nothing to do with the movie, but it’s a catchy song that gets stuck in your head [laughs]. It’s funny how you can plan something and then things go a completely different way. Directing was never part of my plan, but my path got rerouted and here I am. It’s very exciting.

What are you most looking forward to about the next phase of your career?

Honestly? It’s wherever the chips fall. I’ve got a bunch of irons in the fire right now, and I’m looking forward to whatever happens first. I’ll just be lucky and happy to have the opportunity. Setting out to do something and then reaching the goal is very satisfying. Finding passion in something new is such a blessing, and I feel so fortunate.

For more information on ‘Earworm’ visit:
http://www.dirigoentertainment.com/earworm

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Actress Nicole Pacent Talks Career, YouTube Channel and Upcoming Projects

Best known for her portrayal of Aster on the hit web-series, “Anyone But Me”, Nicole Pacent is forging her own path in the ever-changing world of Hollywood.

The beautiful, multi-taleneted actress/singer/producer has a rich resume of work in film and television that’s second only to her extensive theatrical background and infectious personality.

Pacent hosts a successful YouTube channel where she discusses topics that affect many people but ones that are often difficult to discuss due to fear or social stigma.

In addition to the channel, Pacent has several other projects in various stages of production, including a short film as well as an adaptation of Donald Margulies’ “Time Stand Still” – a powerful play about changing relationships and social issues that she plans to stage in the Spring of 2018.

I recently spoke with Nicole about her craft, projects and more in this exclusive new interview.

Was having a career in entertainment something you aspired to do?

Absolutely. From the time I could talk I was intent on being onstage. I grew up an hour outside of New York City, so Broadway and the stage was everything. I started out in musical theatre and even though I didn’t get into “non-musical” plays until high school, I knew I eventually wanted to be in film. I got a great education and then went on to NYU Tisch for Drama. It’s always been the goal for as long as I can remember. 

What brought you to Los Angeles?

It was a combination of things. Primarily, it was because I wanted to go into film and I knew there would be more work here. I remember coming out to L.A. for a trial period and being overwhelmed by the fact that the whole city was built around the entertainment industry. There was a momentous amount of opportunity. I fell in love with all of the things I’d heard about and seen in pictures and in movies. It was only a matter of time.

What attracts you most to a project?

It depends on the project. Sometimes it might be the creative team or someone I admire and want to work with. Other times, the project may have a message that feels very close to my heart and one where I’ll have a way to communicate that message in a creative and honest way. Primarily, it’s a good project with great writing and a team that can make it be a good experience.

What are some of the challenges or things you’ve learned as an actress?

Whenever you tell people that you want to be an actor you’re always going to be told what to expect. What’s surprised me though was something that occurred to me as part of maturing. When I was younger, I had this idea of having to package myself and style in a certain way, but that really has been turned on its head. My experience has been to express yourself genuinely and trust that it will be enough. It’s not so much about L.A. or the business as it is about coming into your own as a person.

Was creating a YouTube channel another way to express your creativity?

At first, I tried bringing characters into it and doing interviews. I had started the channel only a few months after my sister passed away, and because of where I was at the time the channel ended up becoming an outlet for me to express what I was thinking about and going through. I started talking about things that were on my mind and people really connected with it. The channel has since become a way for me to process what I’m going through but to also connect with people who may be going through the same thing. The thread that runs through the channel is something that I put into practice during acting school: If I speak the truth then it gives other people permission to feel and speak theirs.

Are there any projects you’re currently working on?

I have two things going on in the immediate future. I recently finished a short film called “Pagg” that’s currently awaiting film festival reaction. It’s the story about a Sikh-American man who goes about his day on the 4th of July with his American wife and child. A bunch of micro aggressions happen against him that culminates with a major aggression that comes his way in a manner that destroys a lot of the identity of his heritage. I feel very strongly about the content of the film and its relevance to what’s happening right now.  It was written and directed by a dear friend and is very poignant and diverse and I’m really excited about it.

The other thing I’m working on right now is a play that will launch in the spring in L.A. called “Time Stand Still”. It was written by Donald Margulies and is a wonderful and timely piece about a wartime photographer and a journalist who are long time partners. 

What excites you the most about this next phase of your career?

Getting out of the boxes that I’ve put myself into is what I’m most excited about. Opportunities I didn’t see coming and being able to spread my wings into other areas of film while wearing multiple hats. Instead of just focusing on one thing, embracing the multifaceted-ness of my own talent and what’s possible. It’s an exciting time. There are things I know that are happening and other things I’m not certain of yet but I’m ready.

Actor / Director David Rountree To Begin Work On 48-Hour Film Project

David Rountree

During the first week of August, actor/director/producer David Rountree and a team of other notable filmmakers will undertake the 48 Hour Film Project in Los Angeles, CA. Their mission? To write the script, cast the actors, shoot, edit, and hand in a completed film project in two days.

Rountree, along with his partner Jeremy Jordan have teamed up with James Blakeman, Ashley Ayre, Dustin Henderson and Shahriar Rahman (visual effects producer and supervisor, “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows”, “Smurfs”, “Scandal)” to produce the top-quality short film in one weekend as part of The Los Angeles 48 Hour Film Project and premiere it at the festival the following week. The Best Film will receive a grand prize of $5000 and move on to screen at The Cannes Film Festival in France.

David Rountree is no stranger to this blog. His feature-length feature film, “CUT!” — which he co-wrote, produced and directed, was voted one of the top five horror films of 2015. The multi-talented filmmaker has also received praise for work in his baseball themed film, “108 Stitches” (which, along with “CUT!” received a national theatrical release) as well as acting in the new horror film, “The Dark Tapes”. Over the course of his career in TV and film, Rountree has worked alongside such iconic actors as Samuel L. Jackson, Ben Affleck, Josh Hartnett, Rob Lowe, Amy Adams, Kate Beckinsale, Jennifer Garner, Ice Cube, Willem Dafoe, Bruce Davison and Kate Vernon.

Although it’s been seven years since Rountree last did this film competition, his team has won Best Film all three times its entered. This time around the team has rented out Air Hollywood studio, which where almost any movie having an airplane, including the original “Airplane” movie, was shot. The cast and crew of the film are all volunteers, but in order to continue to get the best locations and equipment, they’ve begun a fund-raising campaign.

Watch below to see one of Rountree’s previous 48-Hour Film Project films, “Life For A Life”.

For those who donate, there are definite perks, including film credits that would be given including digital copies of the completed film, signed scripts, invitations to the set and the opportunity to be a “featured background” actor in the film.

Check out the campaign and film above and consider being part of the team for one of the most creative people I know.

Actress Fiona Dourif Talks ‘Cult of Chucky’, ‘Dirk Gently’ and Career Moments

Photo by: Ryan West

Whether she’s portraying the frail but formidable paraplegic, Nica Pierce in “Curse of Chucky”, the crazed assassin, Bart Curlish, in “Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency” or the young nurse, Diane Jones, in the ABC mini-series, “When We Rise”, Fiona Dourif has proven that her versatility and talent as an actress is as genuine as the person she is in real life.

The beautiful Dourif will soon reprise her role as Nica in the upcoming horror/slasher film, “Cult of Chucky”; the seventh entry in the “Child’s Play” franchise scheduled to be released in October. The film, written and directed by series creator, Don Mancini, also reunites Fiona with her real-life father, Brad Dourif (the voice of Chucky) and features Alex Vincent (from the original “Child’s Play”) and Jennifer Tilly (“Bride of Chucky”, “Seed of Chucky”).

I recently spoke with Dourif and got a sneak peek at “Cult of Chucky”, the second season of “Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency”, her career and more in this exclusive new interview. 

It’s been four years since we’re seen you as Nica Pierce in “Curse of Chucky”. Was this new film, “Cult of Chucky” something that had always been planned?

I think Don [Mancini] is always thinking about ways to re-invent the franchise, even though he may not have a set timeline for it. It’s his life’s work. So, there was definitely talk about it on the set of the last film. I even remember Don coming up with idea of the mental asylum while we were shooting the last movie. With this new movie, he combines the old with the new, but it’s not a reboot. It’s a reinvention. It’s seeing Chucky in a way we’ve never seen before. There are definitely some surprises and I’m excited to see what people think.

What was it about the script that originally attracted you to the role of Nica?

I feel very close to the franchise in a way that’s there no parallel. When I was initially given the script, I auditioned for the role of Nica’s sister, Barb. But after watching my tape, Don said there was a quality in my performance that was right for Nica. It wasn’t obvious to me at first but they had me come in to audition and through the process made me understand that my own instincts as a person were very similar to Nica’s. But everything about the project attracted me. The idea that I could lead a franchise I felt this close to and to do something with my dad was an utter dream come true. It was my first studio film and a coming of age for me.

What makes horror such a great genre?

I think it’s fun to feel afraid. It takes up all of your attention in a way that’s exhilarating. It’s a baseline human experience and when you dive into it, it’s like riding a roller coaster.

What are some of the biggest challenges of playing Nica?

 Horror itself is challenging because you have to bring a lot of energy to it. Nica goes through some very dark places, so there was a lot of trying to find freedom in the idea that everyone you love is dying in front of you. Working with the dolls can also get challenging because Chucky gets a lot of takes. You’re also working with a puppet that has six people in green suits around you. There’s someone controlling his eyebrows, someone controlling his lips, someone controlling the way his mouth moves, two people controlling his arm movement. You’re acting in this high intensity moment and in order to make the moment correct all six people have to be in sync together. So, if it’s a two-shot and Chucky’s getting twenty-six takes, you have to keep that energy and terror alive for all twenty-six. I remember getting home from those first days shooting with Chucky and just being a puddle on the floor [laughs]!

Without giving too much away, how would you describe “Cult of Chucky”?

“Cult of Chucky” is like a Chucky movie on drugs. I think that’s the way Don describes it. It’s a psychedelic, hospital movie with a lot of surprises. We’re going to see Chucky in a way we haven’t seen him before. It’s going to be fun. 

What’s it like working with Don Mancini?

Don is a really generous director. He’ll let me bring to it what I think is right and then he’ll come in with opinions and an intelligence that I find very rewarding. We became good friends on the last movie and this year there was a fun synergy between us. I feel very close to this franchise and where the story goes. It’s fun to be able to make something with Don that people really dig.

When did you realize that acting would be your calling?

I remember the exact moment. I had been working on documentaries for a production company for The History Channel when I got the opportunity to take an acting class. I was doing an improv of a pizza delivery scene and when I got up there and performance kicked in it was the most exhilarating thing in the world. That’s when I thought if I could do this with my life, what could possibly be better?

Are there any other projects you’re working on right now?

 I’m in Vancouver shooting “Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency”, which is in its second season with BBC America and Netflix with Elijah Wood and Max Landis at the helm. I play a “Beetlejuice-like” monster who is the assassin of the universe. I’m this dirty, creature and the least sexualized feminine character that has ever been written. It’s maybe my favorite character I’ve ever played.

What can fans expect from the new season?

Mayhem! Max is a very smart, emotional writer. Sometimes the show feels like a graphic novel in the best possible way.

What’s the best bit of advice your dad’s given you as an actor?

There are kernels of things he’s said to me over the years that have become clearer in my journey. I remember a piece of advice I think about now-a-days with “Dirk Gently”. He said this cryptic thing: “You just have to step over the line.” The more I think about what he meant by that is more crystalized for me now.

 Would you like to work with your father on another project at some point?

We talk about that all the time and would love to do something together. There hasn’t been a project yet that’s worked but I would really love that. It would be a gift.

What excites you the most about this next phase of your career?

I’m most excited about finding more freedom in the chances I get to perform. Like anything, the more you do something the better you are at it and the freer you become. It’s a fun ride and I’m so incredibly lucky.

‘Voyeur’: Writer/Director Delaney Bishop Discusses Coachella-Themed Thriller

Delaney Bishop

Terrorized at multiple stops on a road trip to Joshua Tree, three friends realize something unexpected is pulling the strings.

Voyeur” is the feature-length thriller written and directed by Delaney Bishop. The film includes a diverse cast that includes Riker Lynch (“Glee,” “Dancing with the Stars” and founding member of R5), Ayla Kell (“Make It or Break It”), Lisseth Chavez (Netflix’s “One Day at A Time”) and Robert Romanus (“Fast Times at Ridgemont High”). In addition to an inspired script and the unique use of cameras Bishop promises “Voyeur” will also have a cinematic twist that’s never been done before.

Bishop and his partner, Felix Brenner have begun a Kickstarter campaign for fans to help push “Voyeur” to completion. Perks for supporting the film include everything from social media shout outs, posters and screenings to an executive producer credit. Bishop and Brenner’s past collaborations include the award-winning films, “The Death of Salvador Dali” and “Metermaid”.

I recently spoke with Delaney Bishop about “Voyeur”, his career and more in this exclusive new interview.

Where did the idea for “Voyeur” begin? How did the project originate?

It was actually inspired by two trips I took to Joshua Tree. On the first trip, I noticed there were some kids up on the rocks that seemed to have less than benevolent intentions. They were terrorizing people, and the people really had no recourse because they were so far away from civilization and cell phone reception. It got me thinking, this terrain could be very dangerous if someone had bad intensions and was able to track someone down.

The second trip was more of a magical one where we went to the Integratron. It’s located on what’s supposed to be a cosmic gathering point in the desert and is said to have a lot of mystical properties. When I came out of there the idea really came into place and the story unfolded in my head. I was able to get home and write the entire outline in a few hours and wrote the first draft in about three weeks. I teamed up with my partner, Felix Brenner, who’s worked with me on a number of short films. We said let’s do it and that was it. We were up and running.

How would you describe the story of “Voyeur”?

It’s the story of three young friends who take a trip to Joshua Tree desert to hike, spend the night in Palm Springs and attend the festival. But something is following them in the shadows and their trip quickly turns to terror as they’re mysteriously harassed by the same people everywhere they go. The twist reveals that everything was happening for a reason and something very close to home is pulling the strings. 

What was the casting and filming process like?

We had a relationship with a manager who represented Riker Lynch and Ayla Kell. When they were cast that’s when the whole project became real and something I could visualize much more easily. They were absolutely perfect. We also have Lisseth Chavez, who I had auditioned before for another project and Jennifer Blanc, who’s done a lot of horror. We were looking for a father for the three brothers in the film and Robert Romanus was perfect. The whole cast and crew was incredible. It was a very positive set and a lot of fun.

Were there any challenges you experienced during filming?

Part of the twist in the film involves the cameras. There’s a secret that’s revealed at the end that had to consciously be avoided during every scene. There was a certain way we had to shoot in order to hide certain things. The framing was very crucial and quite challenging.

What made you decide to begin a Kickstarter campaign?

With some of the effects that we’re doing and the intricate sound design, we really wanted it to be a notch above what we had originally budgeted for. So we decided to reach out to friends and fans and bring it into the community. So far, it’s been going great.

Was having a career in entertainment something you always aspired to do?

My father was a director and by the time I was sixteen it was pretty much all that I knew how to do. I was taking a lot of pictures and writing quite a bit and went straight to film school while still in high school. It’s always been my passion and something I’ve always been working toward. There was never an alternative.

What excites you the most about “Voyeur”?

We worked so hard on this film and there are things that have never been done before as far as the reveal and the twist. It’s a bold turn that we take but I think people are ready for it. It’s like piecing together a puzzle and I can’t wait for people to see and appreciate how intricate the puzzle is and recognize how much planning went into the story and the way of shooting. Because the technology and the cameras in the film play such a big role this had to be a film and not a novel or an essay. The way of shooting goes hand in hand with the story and I can’t wait for people to have a conversation about it.

For more information on “Voyeur”, Click Here

‘Cross Wars’: Patrick Durham Discusses Action-Packed Sequel Which Stars Brian Austin Green

Straight from the comics to the mean streets of Los Angeles comes veteran Hollywood producer Patrick Durhan’s action packed sequel to 2011’s “Cross”– “Cross Wars”.

Given incredible power by an ancient Celtic Cross, Callan [Brian Austin Green] and his team of weapons experts continue to wage war against the forces of evil in Los Angeles. But when a ruthless villain named Muerte (played by Danny Trejo) threatens to kill his crew, Callan and his team must join forces with an all-girl crime-fighting squad to help save the day.

What they don’t realize is that Muerte is not working alone. He’s resurrected the evil immortal Gunnar (Vinnie Jones) who has a plan more sinister than anyone can imagine. Can Callan and his team prevent the looming apocalypse and save humanity? The superhero adventure was released on February 7 from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment and also stars Tom Sizemore and Amy Jane.

Durham wrote, produced, directed and stars in the offbeat, action-packed sequel and is known for being one of Hollywood’s most in demand horror film producers. He’s also the genius behind such films as “Creepshow Raw,” “Tooth and Nail” and “Cabin Fever 2”.

I recently spoke with him about “Cross Wars” and more in this exclusive new interview.

Where did the idea for “Cross” begin?

I’ve always been a fan of superheroes and one day decided that I’d love to see a Celtic-themed one. I’ve always liked the idea of Green Lantern’s ring and Iron Man’s chest plate. Heroes that have things with power, but that power can eventually run out. It’s the reason why Callan’s cross also runs out of power. It makes him more human by proving that he’s not invincible.

How would you describe the story of “Cross Wars”?

Vinnie Jones is back as Gunnar. He’s a villain who’s cursed to live forever and as a result, he wants to kill everyone on Earth because it’s the only way he can die. Callan and his team are out to get him but they also understand that that they can’t kill him because he’ll only come back. So, they have to figure out a way to imprison him before he can destroy the world. Things get very crazy in end. In the first film, Michael Clarke Duncan’s character was running L.A. Michael who was a great guy who sadly passed away. Danny Trejo had a cameo in the first film and he came back for this one.

What was the writing process like?

The first film we wrote and developed and changed up a little bit along the way. It was a great success. The new film has so many interesting characters to it. We’ve got 6-7 lead females and 6-7 lead Cross guys. We’re going to do a part three which will be a very dark finish to the franchise.

What’s it like working with Brian Austin Green?

We actually wrote the series with him in mind. Brian’s such a nice guy and a great actor who does his own stunts. He’s a legend who’s so great with improve and timing.

You wore so many hats on this film: writer, director, producer and actor. What were some of the biggest challenges?

There are at least fifty things that you’re doing all at the same time. Everything from finding locations to dealing with talent agents. That’s when you suddenly find yourself on set directing and remember, “Wow! I forgot I’ve got lines in this scene!” [laughs].

What else can you tell me about the next film in the franchise?

In  “Cross Wars”,  Danny Trejo’s character reveals a new villain with a new amulet. He’s going to be downright, scary, dirty and awful and a lot more violent. If things fall into place, we’re likely to start filming in the next few months. 

 Was a career in entertainment something you always aspired to do?

Yes! From the first time I saw “Star Wars” and “Raiders of The Lost Ark”. That was when I said, “That’s it. Nothing else will do.” I grew up in the Carolinas and moved to California when I was 18. Forty-six movies later and I’m still doing it.

What’s your role as a producer?

I have a lot of celebrity friends. My job is usually to bring in the celebrities and the money, which are the hardest things to get. That’s my specialty.

Are there any other projects you’re working on right now?

I’m working on a few horror films right now. I’m also working with Victor Miller, who created the original “Friday the 13th”. He and I are going to start work on a film together in the next year. 

What do you enjoy most about the creative process?

When you see the finished film. That’s when you can look up and say, “Wow! We actually created that!” There are a lot of actors that have passed on, but when you see them on screen every day it’s like they’re still alive. Once you do a movie, it’s like you live forever.

Actress Sara Coates Discusses Her New Film, ‘Lane 1974’, Career

Sara Coates

Sara Coates is perhaps most widely recognized for her recurring role of Serena (Pie Girl) in Syfy’s post-apocalyptic series, “Z Nation”. But the beautiful actress is also versatile enough to have appeared in the Sundance hit, “Laggies” with Keira Knightley and more recently, as the voice of Margeurite Bake in the “Resident Evil 7: Biohazard” video game.

Sara will showcase even more of her dynamic prowess with her next film, “Lane 1974”. Written and directed by S. J. Chiro, “Lane 1974” follows the story of 13-year old Lane [Sophia Mitri Schloss] whose life is uprooted when her mother [Katherine Moennig] forces the family to leave the safe confines of the North Carolina commune where she grew up. After a series of dangerous and isolating events, Lane sets out on a 600-mile journey alone in search of the “normal” life she has always imagined.

Sara plays Clarise, one of the only people in the film that gives Lane’s mother, Hallelujah, a chance. Even though Clarise thinks the best of people and their intentions, she eventually becomes frustrated by Hallelujah’s attitude, especially when the children are put in danger because of it. The film will have its world premiere at SXSW on Saturday, March 11th.

I recently spoke with Sara about Lane 1974 and much more in this exclusive new interview.

Let’s talk about your new film, “Lane 1974”. How did it all come about?

I’m from Seattle originally and was really deep in the theater community. The director and screenwriter, S.J. was also from Seattle and we had known each other briefly. When she was going to do this movie she thought of me and the two of us sat down and had coffee and talked for hours about the movie and the time-period. It was the first time I got to sit down with the creator and ask questions and give my opinions. S. J. is so passionate about her characters and her work and eventually offered me the role.

What was it about the script that piqued your interest?

A period piece was unlike anything I had ever done before. That was a huge thing. The script is based on the book, “The Hypocrisy of Disco” and is so beautiful. It’s a coming of age story about a relationship between a mother and daughter and how that relationship can be confusing and not always perfect. I related to the main character, Lane, who wanted to have this incredible life but realizes she has to make it her own. That was really interesting to me.

What can you tell me about your character, Clarise?

Clarise is one of the only characters that gives Hallelujah [played by Katherine Moennig] a chance. Clarise lives on a bus and is this “Earth Mother” who believes that she can fix everyone. She goes through this journey of realizing that she may have to put up walls and not just let everyone in. What was interesting about playing her was that it went against everything I’m usually comfortable with as a girl. Stepping into this new experience of not brushing my hair for a while and wearing relatively no make up wasn’t something I was used to, but it was very exciting to transform into this character.

What was the filming process like? 

Because it was a lower budgeted film there was a lot of team work involved. Coming from community theater where everyone does everything, it was cool to get thrown into that kind of grassroots effort. We filmed at S.J.’s mom’s property in Northern California which was (and still is) a commune. It was very collaborative with lots of long days. This film is close to S.J.’s heart and she was integral in making it a creatively satisfying experience.

I have to ask about another project you were involved in – the video game, Resident Evil 7. What was that experience like?

It’s funny because even though we knew it was horror game, we worked on it for almost a year and a half before they actually told us what game it was [laughs]. I remember they really wanted to keep the character’s relationships strong. So we had vocal coaches and many, many rehearsals. They were adamant about having relationships that were almost palpable as well as terrifying. 

Are there any other projects you’re currently working on?

I have a new web series coming out called “Language Academy”. It’s a funny story about an English as a second language teacher where I got to work with a lot of really funny comedians. And who knows? I may also come back to “Z Nation“. My character has already died twice, but it’s a comedic, apocalyptic world where anything can happen. I love the fans and the ScyFy network and was so excited to be a part of the project. 

Was a career in acting something you always aspired to do?

It was always something that I wanted to do but growing up it seemed so out of reach. My mom and brother are both artists and my dad was an engineer and I always did programs in school that allowed me to do improv or plays. It wasn’t until I got to college that I decided I was going to do it. I realized then that this was what I was going to do because nothing else made me feel so alive. Sometimes people will ask me what my main goal is, and it’s hard to answer because I have so many. I just keep working, meeting people and making an impression. It’s about never stopping and being open to the experiences that come to you.